Posts tagged ‘video’

Six-month Deadline for Internet Closed Captioning Set By FCC

Closed CaptionsInternet consumers must be given experiences that are equal to, if not better than, the experiences provided when content was originally aired on television, is the new mandate included in the  July 13 report by FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee on the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010.

So next January, advanced captioning for live and near-live programming must be online. By next July, all prerecorded programming “substantially edited” for the Internet must be captioned.  Carriers of Internet media must support closed-captioning and end-user display in terms of language, character color, opacity, size, edge, background and font.

“User settings are new to players which support Internet-delivered video, and will require time and effort to implement,” the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee report said.

The new rules allow for Internet delivery of the single standard interchange format now used for digital television. Distributors can transcode for various playout options — such as proprietary or browser-based players — as long as the captioning characteristics are maintained.

Media giants Time-Warner, CNN and Netflix have all been recently sued in City, State and Federal Courts for violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by not providing the deaf with equal access or closed captions to “watch instantly” digital video, archived news and programming.

“The lack of captioned videos means that millions of people with hearing loss will continue to be denied equal access to video news content on CNN.com,” Anna Levine, the plaintiffs” attorney in the suit, said.

The Netflix lawsuit also states: “While streaming (video) provides more access to entertainment to the general public, it threatens to be yet another barrier to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.”

Consequences – legal costs, lost audiences, brand damage – for non-compliance seem serious now, and look like they are just getting started.

More Resources:

dotSUB’s General Overview: U.S. Accessibility Regulations for Online Video Captions

Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (October, 2010): Signed by President Barack Obama

Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (July 2011): First Report on Closed Captioning of Video Programming Delivered Using Internet Protocol

Broadcast Engineering.com (July 2011): FCC sets six-month deadline for Internet closed captioning

KTVU.com (June 2011): CNN Being Sued For Lack Of Closed-Captioning Online

Paid Content (June 2011): Deaf Group Sues Netflix Over Lack Of Captions On Instant Viewing

National Association of the Deaf (NAD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 стоимость услуг копирайтера в украинеоптимизация сайта в яндексескачать программу для взлома icq

Should Digital Video Commercials Come with Subtitles?

Robin KentThis guest post is by Robin Kent, Founder of The Fearless Group, an Advertising Consultancy, former Chairman & CEO of Universal McCann, and member of the dotSUB Board of Advisors.

If the purpose of advertising is to grab the consumer’s attention, how do you do this with over 48 hours of content being uploaded to YouTube every minute?

One way is targeting. It has always been important, but in this new overcrowded environment it is more vital than ever before.  The good news is there are plenty of techniques and data for ensuring advertisers get this right more often than they get it wrong.  Assuming advertisers get the targeting right, is that enough to ensure the consumer understands and acts upon the message?  Perhaps, but could subtitles ensure more consumers see and understand the message. That is a question worth exploring.

Let’s first look at the global world of advertising. In 2011 it’s estimated that $460 Billion will be spent on advertising trying to convince consumers to try new products, stay loyal to existing ones, maybe switch to a competitor’s brand or upgrade to a newer, better, faster version and in general just consume more.

Today only a small portion of this spend will go to video online, but it is never the less an important sector and one which is growing rapidly.  In 2011 digital video advertising in the USA is estimated to be worth $2 billion doubling to $4 billion by 2013.

Advertising is predominantly a local business.  By that I mean although the major global brands sell a similar product market to market, they are very much locally managed, often locally produced and packaged to account for local languages and laws.  Because each market is expected to be profitable from local sales, marketing budgets are also created locally and this often leads to locally produced ads.  In other words, Coca-Cola ads are not necessarily the same market to market. For example, in Spain it’s Coke Light and in the USA Diet Coke—same product, but a very different spin on the values, benefits and image portrayed.

Why is this?  We often hear today that as global consumers we have more in common than not. This may be true of certain brands such as Gucci, Patek Philippe, Porsche, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Singapore Airlines or Emirates Air. However, the majority of the world’s six billion people consume local brands or local variations of global brands. When little children from China visit America for the first time they’re shocked when they see a familiar fast food chain.  “They’ve got McDonald’s here, too?”

If we accept that the vast majority of consumers consume local brands (even if they’re often from global advertisers), then advertising should speak to them in their own language taking into account the local nuances and customs.

But good advertising can be expensive to create.  So can bad advertising, but that’s a discussion for another time.  For a TV or video commercial every second must count.  Actors, locations, directors and film crews all cost money. To shoot an individual commercial for every country is prohibitively expensive for most advertisers, even some of the biggest.  Just because the budget in the USA can justify a “Hollywood” style production, that’s most likely beyond the reach of markets such as Chile, Vietnam, or India.  But the brand’s values must be adhered to wherever the brand exists.

One solution is subtitling. For a small additional cost a video commercial could be made for, say, India’s official 22 recognized languages without losing the power film has over other forms of advertising—the ability to tell a story, using sight, sound, movement, drama and humor.

As an advertiser in the USA do you make a version in English and one for the fast-growing Hispanic population or use subtitles to reduce the cost?

Each advertiser must decide based on the many factors that define their brands, but I think subtitling should at least be considered.написать текст на фотометро газета объявленийpochtolom exe скачать

dotSUB Enterprise Clients: FlowPlayer support

Stand back… our top techies are rolling out the plug-ins!

Now it’s dotSUB support for the FlowPlayer platform.

This provides FlowPlayer users the same streamlined integration and player features as our other five – count ’em 5 – platform plug-ins: Brightcove, LongTail/JW Player, Ooyala, Kaltura and ThePlatform.

If your team is  interested in this FlowPlayer plug-in or any other, and how to leverage it with our Translation Content Management System (TCMS), please contact us.

vzlom-parolja.ruстоимость поддержки и продвижения сайтабаза паролей вконтакте

Kaltura Video Platform Support

Kaltura logo
dotSUB is proud to announce its new plug-in for the Kaltura video platform.

This plug-in allows our Enterprise clients using the Kaltura video platform to render their subtitles from dotSUB on their Kaltura player like this sample video below…

video platform video management video solutions video player

Moving forward, we will make more of our standard features – including our interactive transcriptions and media ingest features – available to users on the Kaltura platform.

More specific technical information on the plug-in is available hereсумка для macbook air 13 ценааудит adwordsскачать garena бесплатно

WETA’s Captions Increase & Sustain Their Video Viewership

WETA - PBS Washington, DC “I can’t wait to go home and read more!” is the feedback Brian King remembers from a participant in his user testing for Learning Media with captions added into online videos.

As WETA’s senior multimedia producer for Brainline.org, a program sharing information and creating support communities for people affected by traumatic brain injury, Brian is measuring first-hand how some media tools enable learning.

“User testing with people who have sustained traumatic brain injury revealed that many had a hard time fully understanding or viewing video content unless it had subtitles,” says Brian. ”The subtitles allowed them to focus on the task of reading, and isolate themselves from video content, which they sometimes found overwhelming.”

Launched in fall 2008, Brainline provides articles, interviews, expert webcasts, and multimedia “voices” on preventing, treating and living with traumatic brain injury. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) partnered with Washington, D.C.-based WETA to create Brainline.org. WETA is the third-largest producing station for PBS with co-productions including The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Washington Week with Gwen Ifill, and documentaries by filmmaker Ken Burns.

“Many of our Learning Media projects receive federal funding, so making sure our video content has 508-compliant closed captions is critical,” Brian says. “Most importantly, we’ve been able to measure how adding captions dramatically increases both video viewership and the length of watching.”

In fact, 45% more people watched half or all of the videos tested when provided with captions as opposed to the same videos offered without. Users have also reported back to WETA that they really appreciate the captions.

“One reason is the quality of the captioning that dotSUB offers. it is far and above what we have had in the past,” says Brian. “And the dotSUB  team has been very responsive to dealing with the jargon-heavy scientific content we feature on some of our sites.”

WETA also ports dotSUB’s time-coded caption files over to WETA’s YouTube channel videos. This sync has also increased views on the captioned videos there. Brian’s team also believes using dotSUB’s interactive transcripts, which can bolster the ability to search for captioned content online, helps users find WETA’s videos online specifically because they are captioned.

“With over 2000 videos across our Learning Media department,” Brian explains, “we don’t have manpower to go through and tweak things by hand to implement captions.”

“So working with dotSUB made it much easier than imagined,” he continues. “Simply tagging videos to be processed “auto-magically” to then show captions saves us hundreds of hours that we can devote to other projects.”

Other projects – like working with Brainline users first-hand to understand their traumatic brain injury needs – and to serve them even better.стоимость поддержки сайтапроверка страницычитать чужую переписку в вк

Watch dotSUB.com Videos On Our iPhone App

dotSUB's iPhone app display

dotSUB’s iPhone app allows users to view any subtitled video from dotSUB.com on their iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. Thousands of videos are available in hundreds of languages right at your finger tips. So far the app is free, but iOS 4.0 or later is required.

Download the dotSUB iPhone App now and see for yourself.

Then, if you like it, please give us feedback and / or a great rating since we’ve not yet received enough ratings to display an average for the current version of our application.

Enjoy dotSUB Mobile!siteконтекстная реклама в гуглевзлом пароля сайта одноклассники

Can “Big Apple Goes Bananas” be Translated into Chinese?

The simple answer is… maybe, depending who you are trying to reach, and how you are trying to reach them. Translation is not only extremely subjective; it is actually an art form.

Just because someone can speak another language does not mean they can take what seems like a simple four-word advertising slogan and translate it with the same “feel” as in the original source language.

Recently, one of our clients called us with three different tag lines for a new product launch which they needed translated into 10 languages. Simple right?  Three tag-lines, each only three or four words, into 10 languages;  Oh, and by the way, they needed this done within 12 hours!

When we are translating, we always ask for as much background information as possible. Some of these questions may not seem relevant to someone who has never had materials translated. It’s important for us to know who you are trying to reach with your material. Will they be spoken or written?

So we often ask to see the source language taglines in context, meaning in the environment they will be displayed, so we can see what is around them, what the end-user will to see.

In some languages this can dramatically affect how the copy is translated. When we get copy out of context, it can be almost impossible to create a translation that’s interpreted in the target language with the same “feel” as intended.

Another particularly challenging issue: Are the taglines intended to have double and triple meanings? This may or may not be something that can be understood linguistically or culturally in some cases.

All this was not problem with these three taglines above, by the way; dotSUB delivered them, in 10, languages within 12 hours!

While we work with some of the best, most experienced, creative linguists in the business, our client made this fast turnaround possible by understanding that the linguistic process is complicated, cooperative and creative. With this kind of teamwork, your messages can reach further linguistically and culturally.

So if you have some tricky material for translation, give us a call and let’s put our teams to work!

~ Ed Zad, dotSUB’s Director of Language Services & Operations

раскрутить сайт дешевокнопка мне нравится на сайт

TED’s Open Translation Project powered by dotSUB: Second Anniversary!

Last week was the second anniversary of the Open Translation Project’s launch – Congrats, again TED!

To date, TED’s volunteer translators have created over 18,000 translations of TEDTalks in 81 languages. For the occasion, the TED blog folks asked a few translators to tell us (in English and the language they translate in) about some of the talks they’ve worked on by filling in the sentence:

(Name of talk) is the most __________ talk I’ve translated because …

dotSUB folks were moved by many of the 10 wonderful responses which you’ll enjoy. One of our favorites:

Iva Todorova, Bulgarian translator:
Benjamin Zander on music and passion is the most inspiring talk I’ve translated because I believe the shortest way to make the world a better place is by loving what we do, and by sharing our passion with other people.”

Yes, Iva, we agree – brava!anonim-sprashivajчастота запросовскачать бесплатно point blank официальный сайт

Beet.TV Interviews dotSUB’s Founder re: TED’s Open Translation Project

It’s been two years since TED Talks enlisted fans around the globe to translate its videos into many languages through its Open Translation Project powered by dotSub, a crowd-sourced translation platform.

Today, some 20,000 videos have been translated into 88 languages by over 6,000 volunteers, says Michael Smolens, founder of New York-based dotSub.

We spoke with him earlier this week at the Streaming Media East conference in Manhattan

The platform is being used by many organizations from big global companies like Adobe to religious organizations in India, he explains.


online mobileраскрутка сайтов дешевоbesplatno vzlom odnoklassniki

dotSUB Founder’s Family in Facebook Friending Follies

When Parents Meddle on Facebook, the Kids Run for ‘Dislike’ Button…amNewYork

During a recent dinner, Daryl Smolens called her daughter Ali and asked her to tell the friend she was dining with “to have fun in Boston this weekend.”

“I turn to [him] and say, ‘I didn’t know you were going to Boston,’” recalled Ali. “My mom already knew because she had read it on Facebook, and here I am sitting next to him and I didn’t even know!”

The 25-year-old West Villager said it’s “100 percent” annoying when her mom knows more about what her friends are doing on Facebook than she does. And she’s not alone.

As Facebook’s popularity spikes among all generations, more parents are getting involved in their kids’ online lives — and it’s not always welcome.

dotSUB Founder's Family: Daryl & Ali Smolens

dotSUB Founder's Family: Daryl & Ali Smolens

“Without fail, every time I sign on [to Facebook], my mom already has commented on one of my friends’ status — even before I’ve had a chance to see it for the first time,” said Ali.

“I’ve known [Ali’s friends] forever,” said Daryl, 63, of the Upper East Side. “They are always at our house hanging out … not always with Ali around.

“I did tell Ali I would stop commenting [on her friends’ status], but, you know, I’m a mother.”

 

Wendy Sachs, editor in chief of Care.com, a parenting website, said: “Some kids definitely have a church/state feeling when it comes to Facebook, and they want to keep their parents out. But parents want to stay connected to their kids, and Facebook offers an often unedited look into what’s really going on in their lives.”

Many parents with younger children insist on having access to their Facebook page to ward off cyberbullying or other inappropriate activity. In an October Care.com survey, one in three parents of children 12 to 17 years old said they feared their kids being cyberbullied more than kidnapping, suicide, car accidents or terrorism.

“Cyberbullying has terrified parents, so monitoring is becoming increasingly important,” said Sachs, who has a 9-year-old son. But even she knows the drawbacks to giving parents permission to view your Facebook page.

“As a child of divorced parents, an innocuous post of a piece I wrote followed by a humorous comment by my dad led to a bitter comment from my mother,” Sachs said. “I ended up deleting the post and almost de-friending my mom on Facebook.”

Mark LoCastro knows that Facebook feuds can mushroom into larger family feuds. The 28-year-old Lower East Side resident wanted some privacy, so he limited access to his profile. But when his dad’s girlfriend discovered that she was blocked, things went south.

“The following day, she was real upset and contacted my dad,” he said.

After a conflict, LoCastro restored her access.

“I guess blocking someone important on Facebook, like a family member, is like blocking them out of your life,” he said. “People sometimes take Facebook too seriously.”

***

Facebook jabs cause real pain

It was once fair enough to say, “It’s just Facebook. Don’t take it so seriously.”

But those days are over, said Manhattan psychologist Dr. Joseph Cilona.

“The impact of Facebook … has significantly changed the landscape of social relationships for many people,” Cilona said. “In my experience, the overwhelming impact has been negative.”

Cilona said that in the past two or three years, “a week has rarely gone by that I have not heard at least several mentions about Facebook in my work.” He’s seen families ripped apart and lovers scorned by words or actions on Facebook.

“It’s clear that more and more people are taking Facebook very seriously,” he said. “It can certainly have serious real-world consequences.”

***

Make rules to nip Facebook chaos in the bud

Kelli Krafsky and her husband, Jason — who dub themselves “The Social Media Couple” and co-authored the book “Facebook and Your Marriage” — have some rules for themselves and their two teenagers:

For kids

1. Watch what you say. No swearing, no threats and no innuendos. And watch who you talk about: Don’t complain about parents, put down siblings or air family spats.

2. Be responsible. Kids must be held accountable for anything posted from their own profile.

3. No secrets. Parents must be able to view all pictures, videos, posts, updates, tags … everything.

For parents

1. Don’t parent on Facebook. Any real-time issues, such as chores, homework or grades, should be dealt with face-to-face, not on Facebook.

2. Back off. There are websites devoted to embarrassing parental posts on Facebook. Don’t humiliate them.

3. Parents have the final say. If you say a friend needs to be blocked, a page “unliked” or a password changed, then so be it. Explain why.рекламные фирмыpr продвижение в интернетескачать программу для взлома skype