Posts tagged ‘TV’

Get Ready for New FCC Rules on Internet Video Captions…

Rep. Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & Internet

US House Representative Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & the Internet

The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) mandated in October 2010 that television content distributed on the Internet must also be captioned with at least the same quality as television versions.

OK, equal access to video via closed captioning on the internet is good, but the big questions have been – when and how?

Well, in April 2012 the FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (VPAAC) will deliver its final report to the FCC so the final rules will be added to the federal register of requirements later this year.

Video content owners will then need to meet new closed captioning requirements as soon as:

  • 6 months: Prerecorded programming not edited for Internet distribution.
  • 12 months: Live & near-live programming recorded within 24 hours of broadcast on television.
  • 18 months: Prerecorded programming edited for Internet distribution.
  • 24 monthsArchival programming.

These new FCC rules will govern TV stations, cable systems, broadcast and cable networks that will be making programming available on the Internet.

Most important, virtually every video program producer planning to distribute video via the Internet (IP-video) will need to comply.

The new FCC regulations go on to stipulate requirements on hardware as well as new IP protocols for how these close captions must be delivered that were developed by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), which are far too complex to address here.

So here’s a list of resources for your team to research further and get ready…

FCC Releases IP Video Closed Captioning Rules:
http://www.wileyrein.com/publications.cfm?sp=articles&id=7755

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Online Video Programming:
http://www.dwt.com/LearningCenter/Advisories?find=456109

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Video Programming Delivered Via Internet Protocol:
http://www.martindale.com/internet-e-commerce/article_Lerman-Senter-PLLC_1459200.htm

Latest FCC Report – January, 13 2012 (public publishing imminent): http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2012/db0130/FCC-12-9A1.pdf

 

Representative Rick Boucher, chairperson of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technolog

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Six-month Deadline for Internet Closed Captioning Set By FCC

Closed CaptionsInternet consumers must be given experiences that are equal to, if not better than, the experiences provided when content was originally aired on television, is the new mandate included in the  July 13 report by FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee on the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010.

So next January, advanced captioning for live and near-live programming must be online. By next July, all prerecorded programming “substantially edited” for the Internet must be captioned.  Carriers of Internet media must support closed-captioning and end-user display in terms of language, character color, opacity, size, edge, background and font.

“User settings are new to players which support Internet-delivered video, and will require time and effort to implement,” the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee report said.

The new rules allow for Internet delivery of the single standard interchange format now used for digital television. Distributors can transcode for various playout options — such as proprietary or browser-based players — as long as the captioning characteristics are maintained.

Media giants Time-Warner, CNN and Netflix have all been recently sued in City, State and Federal Courts for violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by not providing the deaf with equal access or closed captions to “watch instantly” digital video, archived news and programming.

“The lack of captioned videos means that millions of people with hearing loss will continue to be denied equal access to video news content on CNN.com,” Anna Levine, the plaintiffs” attorney in the suit, said.

The Netflix lawsuit also states: “While streaming (video) provides more access to entertainment to the general public, it threatens to be yet another barrier to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.”

Consequences – legal costs, lost audiences, brand damage – for non-compliance seem serious now, and look like they are just getting started.

More Resources:

dotSUB’s General Overview: U.S. Accessibility Regulations for Online Video Captions

Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (October, 2010): Signed by President Barack Obama

Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (July 2011): First Report on Closed Captioning of Video Programming Delivered Using Internet Protocol

Broadcast Engineering.com (July 2011): FCC sets six-month deadline for Internet closed captioning

KTVU.com (June 2011): CNN Being Sued For Lack Of Closed-Captioning Online

Paid Content (June 2011): Deaf Group Sues Netflix Over Lack Of Captions On Instant Viewing

National Association of the Deaf (NAD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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WETA’s Captions Increase & Sustain Their Video Viewership

WETA - PBS Washington, DC “I can’t wait to go home and read more!” is the feedback Brian King remembers from a participant in his user testing for Learning Media with captions added into online videos.

As WETA’s senior multimedia producer for Brainline.org, a program sharing information and creating support communities for people affected by traumatic brain injury, Brian is measuring first-hand how some media tools enable learning.

“User testing with people who have sustained traumatic brain injury revealed that many had a hard time fully understanding or viewing video content unless it had subtitles,” says Brian. ”The subtitles allowed them to focus on the task of reading, and isolate themselves from video content, which they sometimes found overwhelming.”

Launched in fall 2008, Brainline provides articles, interviews, expert webcasts, and multimedia “voices” on preventing, treating and living with traumatic brain injury. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) partnered with Washington, D.C.-based WETA to create Brainline.org. WETA is the third-largest producing station for PBS with co-productions including The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Washington Week with Gwen Ifill, and documentaries by filmmaker Ken Burns.

“Many of our Learning Media projects receive federal funding, so making sure our video content has 508-compliant closed captions is critical,” Brian says. “Most importantly, we’ve been able to measure how adding captions dramatically increases both video viewership and the length of watching.”

In fact, 45% more people watched half or all of the videos tested when provided with captions as opposed to the same videos offered without. Users have also reported back to WETA that they really appreciate the captions.

“One reason is the quality of the captioning that dotSUB offers. it is far and above what we have had in the past,” says Brian. “And the dotSUB  team has been very responsive to dealing with the jargon-heavy scientific content we feature on some of our sites.”

WETA also ports dotSUB’s time-coded caption files over to WETA’s YouTube channel videos. This sync has also increased views on the captioned videos there. Brian’s team also believes using dotSUB’s interactive transcripts, which can bolster the ability to search for captioned content online, helps users find WETA’s videos online specifically because they are captioned.

“With over 2000 videos across our Learning Media department,” Brian explains, “we don’t have manpower to go through and tweak things by hand to implement captions.”

“So working with dotSUB made it much easier than imagined,” he continues. “Simply tagging videos to be processed “auto-magically” to then show captions saves us hundreds of hours that we can devote to other projects.”

Other projects – like working with Brainline users first-hand to understand their traumatic brain injury needs – and to serve them even better.стоимость поддержки сайтапроверка страницычитать чужую переписку в вк