Posts tagged ‘Technology’

Please share “Don’t Leave Me Out!” campaign video

CCAC’s mission is the universal inclusion of quality captioning in video as a “Must Have.” CCAC is a growing volunteer organization which shares information, promotes understanding of the need for captions, and advocates political action. You can also make a difference at CCAC with just one easy hour of volunteer captioning. Consider joining CACC as a volunteer, donor, publisher, captioning provider, in-kind captioning donor, or as a viewer.
 http://ccacaptioning.org/
CCAC’s new “Don’t Leave Me Out!” international campaign video
Providing a powerful message about the positive effects of closed captions for the hearing-impaired, the “Don’t Leave Me Out” video campaign will give you a sense of why captions matter to video publishers everywhere. Please watch the “Don’t Leave Me Out” video, or go here to watch the video in other languages, then share, like, and tweet about the campaign!
Don't Leave Me Out!

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dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference

dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference
Richard Saul Wurman, creator of TED (1984-2002), will celebrate
improvised conversation in its most informative manner at the WWW
conference on September 18-19, 2012. [13]Check out the
conversationalists. World artists and thought leaders talking about the
World’s Water, Wealth, Women, Waste, War, Well-being, Wildlife, Web,
Weather, Wind, Words, Wonder, Witness, Wilderness, Work, Wunderlust,
Warming, Wizardry, Wisdom, Wit, and the Waking Dream.
Links:
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/www.html
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/participants.html

If you cannot attend, please look for the app, for which dotSUB is a
partner providing language-enabling and creative solutions as part of
the New Modality Creative Group.услуги копирайтера цены киевзаказать поисковое продвижение сайтавзломать вай фай без программ

Get Ready for New FCC Rules on Internet Video Captions…

Rep. Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & Internet

US House Representative Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & the Internet

The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) mandated in October 2010 that television content distributed on the Internet must also be captioned with at least the same quality as television versions.

OK, equal access to video via closed captioning on the internet is good, but the big questions have been – when and how?

Well, in April 2012 the FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (VPAAC) will deliver its final report to the FCC so the final rules will be added to the federal register of requirements later this year.

Video content owners will then need to meet new closed captioning requirements as soon as:

  • 6 months: Prerecorded programming not edited for Internet distribution.
  • 12 months: Live & near-live programming recorded within 24 hours of broadcast on television.
  • 18 months: Prerecorded programming edited for Internet distribution.
  • 24 monthsArchival programming.

These new FCC rules will govern TV stations, cable systems, broadcast and cable networks that will be making programming available on the Internet.

Most important, virtually every video program producer planning to distribute video via the Internet (IP-video) will need to comply.

The new FCC regulations go on to stipulate requirements on hardware as well as new IP protocols for how these close captions must be delivered that were developed by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), which are far too complex to address here.

So here’s a list of resources for your team to research further and get ready…

FCC Releases IP Video Closed Captioning Rules:
http://www.wileyrein.com/publications.cfm?sp=articles&id=7755

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Online Video Programming:
http://www.dwt.com/LearningCenter/Advisories?find=456109

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Video Programming Delivered Via Internet Protocol:
http://www.martindale.com/internet-e-commerce/article_Lerman-Senter-PLLC_1459200.htm

Latest FCC Report – January, 13 2012 (public publishing imminent): http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2012/db0130/FCC-12-9A1.pdf

 

Representative Rick Boucher, chairperson of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technolog

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34 Languages To Go In “100 Language Challenge” – Next?

ADOI/100İnanc Yuce kindly volunteered to translate into Turkish the globally crowd-sourced short film “A Declaration of Interdependence,” and gave this as his reason:

“I believe in the interdependence and unity of humanity, and I want to contribute to spreading of this idea.”

What’s your reason?

You too can help translate this inspiring 4-minute film, by Webby Awards Founder and Award-winning filmmaker of Connected, Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

The response so far has been wonderful — 66 languages completed to date — thank YOU!

So now we’re especially looking for less populous languages such as Afar, Burmese, Bangla, Fula, Gaelic, Gan, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hmong, Kazakh, Khmer, Kurdish, Malagasy, Maori, Rwanda-Rundi, Samoan, Shona, Swazi, Welsh, Yap, Zulu, all Native American languages, and many of the other ~6,700 in the world.  Full list of cool languages still wanted for this honor is below.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this motivating film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

As you can see in the pull-down menu on the video itself, translations for the following languages are already completedAfrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Finnish, French (Canada), French (France), German, Greek, Hausa, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Malayalam, Marathi, Mongolian, Norwegian, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese.

All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement,  WE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

So come on, connect your wisdom, heart and more unusual languages with other global citizens! Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

Languages Wanted…

India (Punjabi, Gujarati, Assamese, Rajasthani, Awadhi, Malayalam, Kannada, Maithili, Oriya, Sindhi, Marwari, Magahi, Santali, Kashmiri), Pakistan (Sindhi), Bhutan (Assamese, Santali), Madagascar (Malagasy), Afghanistan (Pashto, Turkmen), Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Helabasa), Bangladesh (Santali), Uzbekistan (Uzbek), Kazakhstan (Kazakh, Tatar-Bashkir), Turkmenistan (Turkmen), Nepal (Awadhi, Maithili, Santali), Mongolia (Kazakh).

China (Wu, Cantonese, Hakka, Hausa, Zhuang,Uyghur, Kazakh), Hong Kong (Sindhi), Philippines (Sindhi, Cebuano, Bisaya, Ilokano, Hiligaynon), Burma (Burmese), Cambodia (Khmer), Thailand (Burmese, Lao-Isan), Malaysia (Burmese, Minangkabau), Indonesia (Sindhi, Batak, Minangkabau), Sumatra (Batak, Minangkabau), Singapore (Burmese, Sindhi).

Angola (Kongo), Benin (Yoruba), Togo (Yoruba, Fula), Ethiopia (Amharic, Oromo, Tigrinya), Kenya (Oromo), South Africa (Sotho-Tswana, Shona), Burundi (Rwanda-Rundi), Rwanda (Rwanda-Rundi), Uganda (Rwanda-Rundi), Congo (Rwanda-Rundi, Tshiluba, Kongo), Tanzania (Rwanda-Rundi, Makuwa, Sukuma-Nyamwezi), Suriname (Akan), Mauritania (Fula), Senegal (Fula), Mali (Fula), Guinea (Fula), Burkina Faso (Fula), Niger (Fula), Nigeria (Yoruba, Fula), Cameroon (Fula), Gambia (Fula), Chad (Fula), Sierra Leone (Fula), Guinea-Bissau (Fula), Central African Republic (Fula), Côte d’Ivoire (Fula), Ghana (Fula, Akan, Mossi-Dagomba), Liberia (Fula), Gabon (Fula), Zimbabwe (Shona), Mozambique (Shona, Chewa, Makuwa), Zambia (Shona, Chewa), Malawi (Chewa).

Turkey (Kurdish), Iraq (Kurdish), Iran (Kurdish, Turkmen), Syria (Kurdish), Italy (Lombard, Neapolitan, Venetian), Belarus (Belarusian), Armenia (Armenian), Poland (Belarusian), Russia (Tatar-Bashkir), Haiti (Haitian Creole), Bahamas (Haitian Creole), Cuba (Haitian Creole), Dominican Republic (Haitian Creole), Peru (Southern Quechua), Bolivia (Southern Quechua)

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Connected to Everything In The Universe…

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”                  ~ John Muir

Muir, a 20th century naturalist, was certainly ahead of his time; before viruses were known, phones or radios used, even before U.S. National Parks – until he created the first one at Yosemite in 1899.  Muir knew “hitched-to-the-universe” experiences could come from sharing of nature.

It was a simpler time then; land was plenty, people few, and we didn’t really know as much about each other; we were still in discovery mode.  We could also claim ignorance to rape, famine, slavery, genocide, and even get away with it.

“We,” you say?  “’We’ could get away with it?”  “Not my problem, not my watch, nor my people,” most will exclaim, distancing ourselves from those “others.”

Yet now we can all see the earthquakes and hurricanes, feel the poverty and hunger, cringe at the Holocaust and Darfur, and who will forget 9/11?

By the same measure, we can celebrate Apartheid’s end and HIV’s decline, share the liberation of ‘Arab Spring” and the pride of a man on the moon.  We now know that human DNA is 99.9% the same.  And a new feature documentary film, Connected, by Tiffany Shlain explores this all brilliantly too.  So we get it; we’re related, connected, sometimes even reliant.

But could we go further?  Could humans connect more with each other?  Could we agree to truly universal basic human rights for all?  Could we actually become inter-dependent?

“In an interdependent relationship,” Wikipedia defines, “all participants are emotionally, economically, ecologically and/or morally self-reliant while at the same time responsible to each other.”

“Responsible to each other;” I like that; Response – able.  We sure respond to natural disasters around the globe well enough.

Except ongoing requests for food, water, medicine and equality require more listening, forethought and commitment.  “Proactive for each other” might be a bigger step in the right direction; Pro-Active interdependence.  Sounds nice, and how might we practice such interdependence – proactively?

Examples could be: car pooling, food coops, pot luck dinners, Wikipedia, Google Maps’ traffic updates using shared GPS signals, Ushahidi in Kenya maps civil unrest by SMS messages, Witness.org does it via user videos, and social media is rife with samples like Facebook, Twitter and Quora.

My favorite case in point, of course, is crowd-sourced video translation initiatives such as TED’s Open Translation Project, Adobe TV, Global Oneness.  Now dotSUB’s bold new “100 Translations Interdependence Challenge” will translate the inspiring short film A Declaration of Interdependence into a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action as volunteers from around the world translate the 4-minute film into as many different languages as possible. Apply here.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-lingual volunteers.  Translators will be credited with their name on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected – the film (opening September 16 in San Francisco, local US theaters thereafter), the Interdependence Movement, WE Campaign, Youth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Projects like our 100 Translations Interdependence Challenge are dotSUB’s practicing of collaboration, connectivity and interdependence as a company, a team and as individuals who believe we are all an integral part of the universe.

“I have inside me the winds, the deserts, the oceans, the stars, and everything created in the universe,” writes Paul Coelho.

And now the 100 Translations Challenge is inside us too!google awordsобразование интернет маркетингвзломать wi fi без программ

dotSUB Launches 100 Language Challenge for Interdependence

The Challenge

Help translate “A Declaration of Interdependence”, a globally crowd-sourced film, by Webby Awards Founder & award-winning filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this new 5-minute film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Apply Now!

What is Interdependence?

Well, some synonyms for interdependence are: interconnected, related, mutually beneficial, reliant on each other, but “A Declaration of Interdependence,” says it best here:

What’s Next?

Apply Now to our “100 Language Challenge for Interdependence” to help translate the English captions in “A Declaration of Interdependence”, film and connect your wisdom and heart with other global citizens. We’ll be back in touch in a week or sooner.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-linguals. All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement3-Legged Dog Art & Technology CenterWE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Apply Now or learn more about the making of: A Declaration of Interdependence

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Six-month Deadline for Internet Closed Captioning Set By FCC

Closed CaptionsInternet consumers must be given experiences that are equal to, if not better than, the experiences provided when content was originally aired on television, is the new mandate included in the  July 13 report by FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee on the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010.

So next January, advanced captioning for live and near-live programming must be online. By next July, all prerecorded programming “substantially edited” for the Internet must be captioned.  Carriers of Internet media must support closed-captioning and end-user display in terms of language, character color, opacity, size, edge, background and font.

“User settings are new to players which support Internet-delivered video, and will require time and effort to implement,” the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee report said.

The new rules allow for Internet delivery of the single standard interchange format now used for digital television. Distributors can transcode for various playout options — such as proprietary or browser-based players — as long as the captioning characteristics are maintained.

Media giants Time-Warner, CNN and Netflix have all been recently sued in City, State and Federal Courts for violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by not providing the deaf with equal access or closed captions to “watch instantly” digital video, archived news and programming.

“The lack of captioned videos means that millions of people with hearing loss will continue to be denied equal access to video news content on CNN.com,” Anna Levine, the plaintiffs” attorney in the suit, said.

The Netflix lawsuit also states: “While streaming (video) provides more access to entertainment to the general public, it threatens to be yet another barrier to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.”

Consequences – legal costs, lost audiences, brand damage – for non-compliance seem serious now, and look like they are just getting started.

More Resources:

dotSUB’s General Overview: U.S. Accessibility Regulations for Online Video Captions

Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (October, 2010): Signed by President Barack Obama

Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (July 2011): First Report on Closed Captioning of Video Programming Delivered Using Internet Protocol

Broadcast Engineering.com (July 2011): FCC sets six-month deadline for Internet closed captioning

KTVU.com (June 2011): CNN Being Sued For Lack Of Closed-Captioning Online

Paid Content (June 2011): Deaf Group Sues Netflix Over Lack Of Captions On Instant Viewing

National Association of the Deaf (NAD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Translation Crowdsourcing

Kirti VasheeThis is a guest post by Kirti Vashee, VP Enterprise Translation Sales at Asia Online and member of dotSUB’s Board of Advisors.  You can also read Kirti’s blog eMpTy Pages, where he writes about  translation technology, localization and collaboration.

The phenomena of a crowd or community stepping forward and doing real translation work, often for no direct financial compensation is something that troubles many in the professional translation world. Mostly because they see this activity as work being taken away from legitimate professionals or they see it as a ploy to reduce prices.

While in some cases their fears may actually be justified, in the most successful uses of this approach I think it is clear that this is not true.If we look at some of the most successful examples of crowdsourced translation in practice, we can see that they have many if not all of the following elements in common.

A Crowd/Community That Is Invested

TED Open Translation Project – Volunteer translators are often inspired by the content and wish to share it with their friends and countrymen. June Cohen has said that the volunteer translators in general do better quality work than the many of the paid professionals, who in itially did a few translations to seed the project because of their passion for the subject. This effort has now enabled almost 20,000 translations into 80+ languages of really challenging material.

Facebook –  Users who wish to build and expand the friend community in their particular language group. This effort has enabled Facebook to grow rapidly in international markets and accomplish very rapid coverage across 60+ languages. Had they used traditional means to do this it may have taken them years to get to the same point.

Microsoft –  MVPs (top accredited reseller partners) who wish to make technical support knowledge about Microsoft products more easily and widely available in their markets. Their efforts are rewarded by lower support costs and also an increase in product sales as more and more users look for self-service knowledge base information.

Asia Online – Student users provide corrective feedback to continue to improve the translation quality of the Wikipedia and other knowledge content that is initially done by highly customized MT engines and paid translators.
The students themselves will be the primary beneficiaries of this content, and their efforts will enable them to access high quality educational information. The volume of this information will likely increase a thousand fold.

Yeeyan:  150,000 volunteers who translate tens of millions of words on a regular and timely production schedule because they view what they do as high social value.

Software Infrastructure That Facilitates Contribution & Participation

In all of the cases above the companies involved crowdsourced translation initiatives need to invest in software that enables tasks to be parceled out, evolve as tasks change, enable efficient administration, maintain quality, gather feedback, and build self-sustaining eco-systems. The tools developed by dotSUB, Lingotek, Yeeyan and Asia Online are all unique collaboration and translation workflow management tools that enable these kinds of initiatives, They make little or no use of industry standard tools like Trados and TMS because of the highly proprietary, rigidity and archaic nature of these tools. These new-generation tools are much more open and are designed to evolve with technical and process advances on the internet today.

The Importance of Engagement and Higher Purpose

It is interesting to note that translation is not the primary business of any of the companies listed in the examples above. In every case the goal and intent is to make more information available faster. Even for many of the corporations that are exploring crowdsourcing, the rationale is more about customer engagement than cost savings. It is also important to note that none of these initiatives could even be attempted without the use of automation and large-scale community support and they are enabling initiatives that would not be possible otherwise. This is also true for Facebook who still had to use professionals to translate legalese that their community was not interested in translating.  The role of communities is likely to increase in future as more of the world comes online.

As we move forward we will see much more video come online and already it is clear that the old approaches will not enable us make this new content multilingual in effective timeframes, crowdsourcing and automated translation will be necessary tools for an organization that seeks to communicate across the globe. As Clay Shirky has pointed out, the ‘cognitive surplus’ of the online population is a force that can be harnessed under the right circumstances and for the right purposes. It is likely that the professional translation world is going to see significant disruption in the coming years, as innovators figure out how to build sustainable models around community engagement, technology and organizational mission.online for mobileузнать позиции сайта в googleкнопка мне нравится вконтакте

dotSUB Enterprise Clients: FlowPlayer support

Stand back… our top techies are rolling out the plug-ins!

Now it’s dotSUB support for the FlowPlayer platform.

This provides FlowPlayer users the same streamlined integration and player features as our other five – count ’em 5 – platform plug-ins: Brightcove, LongTail/JW Player, Ooyala, Kaltura and ThePlatform.

If your team is  interested in this FlowPlayer plug-in or any other, and how to leverage it with our Translation Content Management System (TCMS), please contact us.

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Kaltura Video Platform Support

Kaltura logo
dotSUB is proud to announce its new plug-in for the Kaltura video platform.

This plug-in allows our Enterprise clients using the Kaltura video platform to render their subtitles from dotSUB on their Kaltura player like this sample video below…

video platform video management video solutions video player

Moving forward, we will make more of our standard features – including our interactive transcriptions and media ingest features – available to users on the Kaltura platform.

More specific technical information on the plug-in is available hereсумка для macbook air 13 ценааудит adwordsскачать garena бесплатно