Posts tagged ‘subtitles’

Video with Interactive Transcription – New Video Embed

dotSUB recently added the ability to embed the transcription of a video into your webpage as well.Our users told us: “We want video with the transcription! We want it to highlight the curren

tly spoken line! We want it to seek when I click on a line in the transcription!”

dotSUB listens. We now offer the ability to embed the video with an interactive transcription. Here are the benefits:

1) Engage your audience for more minutes as they navigate transcripts.

2) Be found. The transcript text dramatically improves SEO results.

3) Increase your audience with the 20+% who are hearing impaired or have English as a second language.

4) Provide context with the rich text that accompanies your video.

We’d love to receive links to examples of our users who take advantage of embedded interactive video transcripts

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30% Audience Increases Make Video Captioning a “Must Have”

30% Audience Increases Make Video Captioning a “Must Have”

US Audience Grows with hearing-impaired, ESL & Spanish-speakers
A new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine reports that 20% of the US population, or 48 million people, have hearing loss to the degree that they benefit from video captioning. English is a second language for 18% of the US population as well.

While hearing-impaired and ESL populations prefer, and often depend on, video content with closed captioning, better comprehension of videos regardless of accents or auditory dyslexia is also documented. And a Tremor Video study showed that ads in Spanish engaged US Hispanic users 200% more than in English.

Captions offer viewers other benefits such as watching videos in public settings without a headset, or searching and navigating videos via interactive transript text. SEO engines can read the text to make your video more discoverable, and provide contextual ad placement opportunities. This engagement, discoverability, and the goodwill generated, increases social sharing or “Earned Media”— free, recommended views

Combining these reach numbers with the increases in engagement, SEO, and “earned media,” it’s easy to see why captioning videos becomes a “must have” choice.

Captioning required for web video as soon as September 2012
Following dotSUB’s earlier blog post on the final report of FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (VPAAC), the requirements were published in the Federal Register. Video content owners must begin meeting new closed captioning requirements in 6, 12, or 18 months from March 30, 2012. Enforcement criteria and deadlines depend on whether the programming is prerecorded, live or near-live, and edited for Internet distribution or not, and become increasingly shorter starting March of 2014. Video publishers who want compliance guidance, please contact us.тизерная реклама этогенератор favicon онлайнвопросы для спрашивай ру девушке и ответы

dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference

dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference
Richard Saul Wurman, creator of TED (1984-2002), will celebrate
improvised conversation in its most informative manner at the WWW
conference on September 18-19, 2012. [13]Check out the
conversationalists. World artists and thought leaders talking about the
World’s Water, Wealth, Women, Waste, War, Well-being, Wildlife, Web,
Weather, Wind, Words, Wonder, Witness, Wilderness, Work, Wunderlust,
Warming, Wizardry, Wisdom, Wit, and the Waking Dream.
Links:
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/www.html
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/participants.html

If you cannot attend, please look for the app, for which dotSUB is a
partner providing language-enabling and creative solutions as part of
the New Modality Creative Group.услуги копирайтера цены киевзаказать поисковое продвижение сайтавзломать вай фай без программ

Gangaji – “Who Are You?” translated into 40 languages

Who Are You?
Who Are You?, a beautiful inquiry into our perspective as humans by Gangaji reading her book “The Diamond in Your Pocket,” so inspired dotSUB’s community that they have now voluntarily translated the video into 40 languages including Chinese, Greek, Hebrew, Indonesian, Turkish, Russian and Vietnamese. Now that’s trust!

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Get Ready for New FCC Rules on Internet Video Captions…

Rep. Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & Internet

US House Representative Rick Boucher, Chairman, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology & the Internet

The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) mandated in October 2010 that television content distributed on the Internet must also be captioned with at least the same quality as television versions.

OK, equal access to video via closed captioning on the internet is good, but the big questions have been – when and how?

Well, in April 2012 the FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (VPAAC) will deliver its final report to the FCC so the final rules will be added to the federal register of requirements later this year.

Video content owners will then need to meet new closed captioning requirements as soon as:

  • 6 months: Prerecorded programming not edited for Internet distribution.
  • 12 months: Live & near-live programming recorded within 24 hours of broadcast on television.
  • 18 months: Prerecorded programming edited for Internet distribution.
  • 24 monthsArchival programming.

These new FCC rules will govern TV stations, cable systems, broadcast and cable networks that will be making programming available on the Internet.

Most important, virtually every video program producer planning to distribute video via the Internet (IP-video) will need to comply.

The new FCC regulations go on to stipulate requirements on hardware as well as new IP protocols for how these close captions must be delivered that were developed by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE), which are far too complex to address here.

So here’s a list of resources for your team to research further and get ready…

FCC Releases IP Video Closed Captioning Rules:
http://www.wileyrein.com/publications.cfm?sp=articles&id=7755

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Online Video Programming:
http://www.dwt.com/LearningCenter/Advisories?find=456109

FCC Adopts Closed Captioning Rules for Video Programming Delivered Via Internet Protocol:
http://www.martindale.com/internet-e-commerce/article_Lerman-Senter-PLLC_1459200.htm

Latest FCC Report – January, 13 2012 (public publishing imminent): http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2012/db0130/FCC-12-9A1.pdf

 

Representative Rick Boucher, chairperson of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technolog

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34 Languages To Go In “100 Language Challenge” – Next?

ADOI/100İnanc Yuce kindly volunteered to translate into Turkish the globally crowd-sourced short film “A Declaration of Interdependence,” and gave this as his reason:

“I believe in the interdependence and unity of humanity, and I want to contribute to spreading of this idea.”

What’s your reason?

You too can help translate this inspiring 4-minute film, by Webby Awards Founder and Award-winning filmmaker of Connected, Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

The response so far has been wonderful — 66 languages completed to date — thank YOU!

So now we’re especially looking for less populous languages such as Afar, Burmese, Bangla, Fula, Gaelic, Gan, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hmong, Kazakh, Khmer, Kurdish, Malagasy, Maori, Rwanda-Rundi, Samoan, Shona, Swazi, Welsh, Yap, Zulu, all Native American languages, and many of the other ~6,700 in the world.  Full list of cool languages still wanted for this honor is below.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this motivating film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

As you can see in the pull-down menu on the video itself, translations for the following languages are already completedAfrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Finnish, French (Canada), French (France), German, Greek, Hausa, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Malayalam, Marathi, Mongolian, Norwegian, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese.

All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement,  WE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

So come on, connect your wisdom, heart and more unusual languages with other global citizens! Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

Languages Wanted…

India (Punjabi, Gujarati, Assamese, Rajasthani, Awadhi, Malayalam, Kannada, Maithili, Oriya, Sindhi, Marwari, Magahi, Santali, Kashmiri), Pakistan (Sindhi), Bhutan (Assamese, Santali), Madagascar (Malagasy), Afghanistan (Pashto, Turkmen), Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Helabasa), Bangladesh (Santali), Uzbekistan (Uzbek), Kazakhstan (Kazakh, Tatar-Bashkir), Turkmenistan (Turkmen), Nepal (Awadhi, Maithili, Santali), Mongolia (Kazakh).

China (Wu, Cantonese, Hakka, Hausa, Zhuang,Uyghur, Kazakh), Hong Kong (Sindhi), Philippines (Sindhi, Cebuano, Bisaya, Ilokano, Hiligaynon), Burma (Burmese), Cambodia (Khmer), Thailand (Burmese, Lao-Isan), Malaysia (Burmese, Minangkabau), Indonesia (Sindhi, Batak, Minangkabau), Sumatra (Batak, Minangkabau), Singapore (Burmese, Sindhi).

Angola (Kongo), Benin (Yoruba), Togo (Yoruba, Fula), Ethiopia (Amharic, Oromo, Tigrinya), Kenya (Oromo), South Africa (Sotho-Tswana, Shona), Burundi (Rwanda-Rundi), Rwanda (Rwanda-Rundi), Uganda (Rwanda-Rundi), Congo (Rwanda-Rundi, Tshiluba, Kongo), Tanzania (Rwanda-Rundi, Makuwa, Sukuma-Nyamwezi), Suriname (Akan), Mauritania (Fula), Senegal (Fula), Mali (Fula), Guinea (Fula), Burkina Faso (Fula), Niger (Fula), Nigeria (Yoruba, Fula), Cameroon (Fula), Gambia (Fula), Chad (Fula), Sierra Leone (Fula), Guinea-Bissau (Fula), Central African Republic (Fula), Côte d’Ivoire (Fula), Ghana (Fula, Akan, Mossi-Dagomba), Liberia (Fula), Gabon (Fula), Zimbabwe (Shona), Mozambique (Shona, Chewa, Makuwa), Zambia (Shona, Chewa), Malawi (Chewa).

Turkey (Kurdish), Iraq (Kurdish), Iran (Kurdish, Turkmen), Syria (Kurdish), Italy (Lombard, Neapolitan, Venetian), Belarus (Belarusian), Armenia (Armenian), Poland (Belarusian), Russia (Tatar-Bashkir), Haiti (Haitian Creole), Bahamas (Haitian Creole), Cuba (Haitian Creole), Dominican Republic (Haitian Creole), Peru (Southern Quechua), Bolivia (Southern Quechua)

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Connected to Everything In The Universe…

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”                  ~ John Muir

Muir, a 20th century naturalist, was certainly ahead of his time; before viruses were known, phones or radios used, even before U.S. National Parks – until he created the first one at Yosemite in 1899.  Muir knew “hitched-to-the-universe” experiences could come from sharing of nature.

It was a simpler time then; land was plenty, people few, and we didn’t really know as much about each other; we were still in discovery mode.  We could also claim ignorance to rape, famine, slavery, genocide, and even get away with it.

“We,” you say?  “’We’ could get away with it?”  “Not my problem, not my watch, nor my people,” most will exclaim, distancing ourselves from those “others.”

Yet now we can all see the earthquakes and hurricanes, feel the poverty and hunger, cringe at the Holocaust and Darfur, and who will forget 9/11?

By the same measure, we can celebrate Apartheid’s end and HIV’s decline, share the liberation of ‘Arab Spring” and the pride of a man on the moon.  We now know that human DNA is 99.9% the same.  And a new feature documentary film, Connected, by Tiffany Shlain explores this all brilliantly too.  So we get it; we’re related, connected, sometimes even reliant.

But could we go further?  Could humans connect more with each other?  Could we agree to truly universal basic human rights for all?  Could we actually become inter-dependent?

“In an interdependent relationship,” Wikipedia defines, “all participants are emotionally, economically, ecologically and/or morally self-reliant while at the same time responsible to each other.”

“Responsible to each other;” I like that; Response – able.  We sure respond to natural disasters around the globe well enough.

Except ongoing requests for food, water, medicine and equality require more listening, forethought and commitment.  “Proactive for each other” might be a bigger step in the right direction; Pro-Active interdependence.  Sounds nice, and how might we practice such interdependence – proactively?

Examples could be: car pooling, food coops, pot luck dinners, Wikipedia, Google Maps’ traffic updates using shared GPS signals, Ushahidi in Kenya maps civil unrest by SMS messages, Witness.org does it via user videos, and social media is rife with samples like Facebook, Twitter and Quora.

My favorite case in point, of course, is crowd-sourced video translation initiatives such as TED’s Open Translation Project, Adobe TV, Global Oneness.  Now dotSUB’s bold new “100 Translations Interdependence Challenge” will translate the inspiring short film A Declaration of Interdependence into a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action as volunteers from around the world translate the 4-minute film into as many different languages as possible. Apply here.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-lingual volunteers.  Translators will be credited with their name on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected – the film (opening September 16 in San Francisco, local US theaters thereafter), the Interdependence Movement, WE Campaign, Youth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Projects like our 100 Translations Interdependence Challenge are dotSUB’s practicing of collaboration, connectivity and interdependence as a company, a team and as individuals who believe we are all an integral part of the universe.

“I have inside me the winds, the deserts, the oceans, the stars, and everything created in the universe,” writes Paul Coelho.

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dotSUB Launches 100 Language Challenge for Interdependence

The Challenge

Help translate “A Declaration of Interdependence”, a globally crowd-sourced film, by Webby Awards Founder & award-winning filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this new 5-minute film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Apply Now!

What is Interdependence?

Well, some synonyms for interdependence are: interconnected, related, mutually beneficial, reliant on each other, but “A Declaration of Interdependence,” says it best here:

What’s Next?

Apply Now to our “100 Language Challenge for Interdependence” to help translate the English captions in “A Declaration of Interdependence”, film and connect your wisdom and heart with other global citizens. We’ll be back in touch in a week or sooner.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-linguals. All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement3-Legged Dog Art & Technology CenterWE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Apply Now or learn more about the making of: A Declaration of Interdependence

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Everybody can push videos and subtitles to YouTube

Starting today dotSUB allows all its users to send their subtitled dotSUB videos to their YouTube account.

Users can upload and caption their videos on dotSUB and push the video file and subtitles to YouTube. If your videos are already uploaded to YouTube, do not fear! Just upload the video file to dotSUB and we will help you match up your dotSUB subtitles to the existing video on YouTube.

dotSUB is the perfect captioning and subtitling tool to complement your YouTube account, and to increase your video views globally!раскрутка нового сайтабелые методы раскрутки сайтапрограммы для взлома сайтов

Should Digital Video Commercials Come with Subtitles?

Robin KentThis guest post is by Robin Kent, Founder of The Fearless Group, an Advertising Consultancy, former Chairman & CEO of Universal McCann, and member of the dotSUB Board of Advisors.

If the purpose of advertising is to grab the consumer’s attention, how do you do this with over 48 hours of content being uploaded to YouTube every minute?

One way is targeting. It has always been important, but in this new overcrowded environment it is more vital than ever before.  The good news is there are plenty of techniques and data for ensuring advertisers get this right more often than they get it wrong.  Assuming advertisers get the targeting right, is that enough to ensure the consumer understands and acts upon the message?  Perhaps, but could subtitles ensure more consumers see and understand the message. That is a question worth exploring.

Let’s first look at the global world of advertising. In 2011 it’s estimated that $460 Billion will be spent on advertising trying to convince consumers to try new products, stay loyal to existing ones, maybe switch to a competitor’s brand or upgrade to a newer, better, faster version and in general just consume more.

Today only a small portion of this spend will go to video online, but it is never the less an important sector and one which is growing rapidly.  In 2011 digital video advertising in the USA is estimated to be worth $2 billion doubling to $4 billion by 2013.

Advertising is predominantly a local business.  By that I mean although the major global brands sell a similar product market to market, they are very much locally managed, often locally produced and packaged to account for local languages and laws.  Because each market is expected to be profitable from local sales, marketing budgets are also created locally and this often leads to locally produced ads.  In other words, Coca-Cola ads are not necessarily the same market to market. For example, in Spain it’s Coke Light and in the USA Diet Coke—same product, but a very different spin on the values, benefits and image portrayed.

Why is this?  We often hear today that as global consumers we have more in common than not. This may be true of certain brands such as Gucci, Patek Philippe, Porsche, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Singapore Airlines or Emirates Air. However, the majority of the world’s six billion people consume local brands or local variations of global brands. When little children from China visit America for the first time they’re shocked when they see a familiar fast food chain.  “They’ve got McDonald’s here, too?”

If we accept that the vast majority of consumers consume local brands (even if they’re often from global advertisers), then advertising should speak to them in their own language taking into account the local nuances and customs.

But good advertising can be expensive to create.  So can bad advertising, but that’s a discussion for another time.  For a TV or video commercial every second must count.  Actors, locations, directors and film crews all cost money. To shoot an individual commercial for every country is prohibitively expensive for most advertisers, even some of the biggest.  Just because the budget in the USA can justify a “Hollywood” style production, that’s most likely beyond the reach of markets such as Chile, Vietnam, or India.  But the brand’s values must be adhered to wherever the brand exists.

One solution is subtitling. For a small additional cost a video commercial could be made for, say, India’s official 22 recognized languages without losing the power film has over other forms of advertising—the ability to tell a story, using sight, sound, movement, drama and humor.

As an advertiser in the USA do you make a version in English and one for the fast-growing Hispanic population or use subtitles to reduce the cost?

Each advertiser must decide based on the many factors that define their brands, but I think subtitling should at least be considered.написать текст на фотометро газета объявленийpochtolom exe скачать