Posts tagged ‘Leadership’

dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference

dotSUB is partner to Richard Saul Wurman’s the WWW Conference
Richard Saul Wurman, creator of TED (1984-2002), will celebrate
improvised conversation in its most informative manner at the WWW
conference on September 18-19, 2012. [13]Check out the
conversationalists. World artists and thought leaders talking about the
World’s Water, Wealth, Women, Waste, War, Well-being, Wildlife, Web,
Weather, Wind, Words, Wonder, Witness, Wilderness, Work, Wunderlust,
Warming, Wizardry, Wisdom, Wit, and the Waking Dream.
Links:
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/www.html
http://www.thewwwconference.com/pages/participants.html

If you cannot attend, please look for the app, for which dotSUB is a
partner providing language-enabling and creative solutions as part of
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Gangaji – “Who Are You?” translated into 40 languages

Who Are You?
Who Are You?, a beautiful inquiry into our perspective as humans by Gangaji reading her book “The Diamond in Your Pocket,” so inspired dotSUB’s community that they have now voluntarily translated the video into 40 languages including Chinese, Greek, Hebrew, Indonesian, Turkish, Russian and Vietnamese. Now that’s trust!

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In Video We Trust

In Video We Trust

Happy Birthday David (NEW Prometheus Viral!)
“Happy Birthday, David!” a viral campaign for a forthcoming feature film
Why is online video so successful?  Because it often feels so real.  We can see it, hear it, share it.  We laugh, we cry, we get off our butts and do something because our emotions have been truly touched.  And we trust our emotions.

Genuinely connecting with people also takes serious effort – by both video producers and viewers.  Film, TV, News – regardless if it’s highbrow cultural content or commercials, music videos, even skateboarding dogs – seems to take more human effort than text-based email, blogs or social media, where the content can be manufactured, manipulated and blasted out.  We trust the work – even talking robots like “David” above!

We also trust language, especially our native tongue.  Language connects our cultures, our values, our hearts & minds.  We rely on words, messages and themes that we can relate to.  That’s why dotSUB is growing so fast.  Using closed captions and translated subtitles in your videos makes them understandable, relevant, and proximate.  Videos in any language build trust in your story, your brand, in you.  So here’s more about how dotSUB can help your team grow the trust.

Sotheby's Documentary Series
Sotheby’s, the fine arts auction house founded in London 1744, trusts dotSUB’s translations for its documentary series about global operations in 90 locations in 40 countries conducting 250 auctions each year in over 70 categories. Learn about Sotheby’s Artists, Collectors, Rostrums and The House here.

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34 Languages To Go In “100 Language Challenge” – Next?

ADOI/100İnanc Yuce kindly volunteered to translate into Turkish the globally crowd-sourced short film “A Declaration of Interdependence,” and gave this as his reason:

“I believe in the interdependence and unity of humanity, and I want to contribute to spreading of this idea.”

What’s your reason?

You too can help translate this inspiring 4-minute film, by Webby Awards Founder and Award-winning filmmaker of Connected, Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

The response so far has been wonderful — 66 languages completed to date — thank YOU!

So now we’re especially looking for less populous languages such as Afar, Burmese, Bangla, Fula, Gaelic, Gan, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hmong, Kazakh, Khmer, Kurdish, Malagasy, Maori, Rwanda-Rundi, Samoan, Shona, Swazi, Welsh, Yap, Zulu, all Native American languages, and many of the other ~6,700 in the world.  Full list of cool languages still wanted for this honor is below.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this motivating film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

As you can see in the pull-down menu on the video itself, translations for the following languages are already completedAfrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Finnish, French (Canada), French (France), German, Greek, Hausa, Hebrew, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Malayalam, Marathi, Mongolian, Norwegian, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tagalog, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese.

All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement,  WE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

So come on, connect your wisdom, heart and more unusual languages with other global citizens! Contact Jesse with your questions: [email protected] or Apply Now!

Languages Wanted…

India (Punjabi, Gujarati, Assamese, Rajasthani, Awadhi, Malayalam, Kannada, Maithili, Oriya, Sindhi, Marwari, Magahi, Santali, Kashmiri), Pakistan (Sindhi), Bhutan (Assamese, Santali), Madagascar (Malagasy), Afghanistan (Pashto, Turkmen), Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Helabasa), Bangladesh (Santali), Uzbekistan (Uzbek), Kazakhstan (Kazakh, Tatar-Bashkir), Turkmenistan (Turkmen), Nepal (Awadhi, Maithili, Santali), Mongolia (Kazakh).

China (Wu, Cantonese, Hakka, Hausa, Zhuang,Uyghur, Kazakh), Hong Kong (Sindhi), Philippines (Sindhi, Cebuano, Bisaya, Ilokano, Hiligaynon), Burma (Burmese), Cambodia (Khmer), Thailand (Burmese, Lao-Isan), Malaysia (Burmese, Minangkabau), Indonesia (Sindhi, Batak, Minangkabau), Sumatra (Batak, Minangkabau), Singapore (Burmese, Sindhi).

Angola (Kongo), Benin (Yoruba), Togo (Yoruba, Fula), Ethiopia (Amharic, Oromo, Tigrinya), Kenya (Oromo), South Africa (Sotho-Tswana, Shona), Burundi (Rwanda-Rundi), Rwanda (Rwanda-Rundi), Uganda (Rwanda-Rundi), Congo (Rwanda-Rundi, Tshiluba, Kongo), Tanzania (Rwanda-Rundi, Makuwa, Sukuma-Nyamwezi), Suriname (Akan), Mauritania (Fula), Senegal (Fula), Mali (Fula), Guinea (Fula), Burkina Faso (Fula), Niger (Fula), Nigeria (Yoruba, Fula), Cameroon (Fula), Gambia (Fula), Chad (Fula), Sierra Leone (Fula), Guinea-Bissau (Fula), Central African Republic (Fula), Côte d’Ivoire (Fula), Ghana (Fula, Akan, Mossi-Dagomba), Liberia (Fula), Gabon (Fula), Zimbabwe (Shona), Mozambique (Shona, Chewa, Makuwa), Zambia (Shona, Chewa), Malawi (Chewa).

Turkey (Kurdish), Iraq (Kurdish), Iran (Kurdish, Turkmen), Syria (Kurdish), Italy (Lombard, Neapolitan, Venetian), Belarus (Belarusian), Armenia (Armenian), Poland (Belarusian), Russia (Tatar-Bashkir), Haiti (Haitian Creole), Bahamas (Haitian Creole), Cuba (Haitian Creole), Dominican Republic (Haitian Creole), Peru (Southern Quechua), Bolivia (Southern Quechua)

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Connected to Everything In The Universe…

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”                  ~ John Muir

Muir, a 20th century naturalist, was certainly ahead of his time; before viruses were known, phones or radios used, even before U.S. National Parks – until he created the first one at Yosemite in 1899.  Muir knew “hitched-to-the-universe” experiences could come from sharing of nature.

It was a simpler time then; land was plenty, people few, and we didn’t really know as much about each other; we were still in discovery mode.  We could also claim ignorance to rape, famine, slavery, genocide, and even get away with it.

“We,” you say?  “’We’ could get away with it?”  “Not my problem, not my watch, nor my people,” most will exclaim, distancing ourselves from those “others.”

Yet now we can all see the earthquakes and hurricanes, feel the poverty and hunger, cringe at the Holocaust and Darfur, and who will forget 9/11?

By the same measure, we can celebrate Apartheid’s end and HIV’s decline, share the liberation of ‘Arab Spring” and the pride of a man on the moon.  We now know that human DNA is 99.9% the same.  And a new feature documentary film, Connected, by Tiffany Shlain explores this all brilliantly too.  So we get it; we’re related, connected, sometimes even reliant.

But could we go further?  Could humans connect more with each other?  Could we agree to truly universal basic human rights for all?  Could we actually become inter-dependent?

“In an interdependent relationship,” Wikipedia defines, “all participants are emotionally, economically, ecologically and/or morally self-reliant while at the same time responsible to each other.”

“Responsible to each other;” I like that; Response – able.  We sure respond to natural disasters around the globe well enough.

Except ongoing requests for food, water, medicine and equality require more listening, forethought and commitment.  “Proactive for each other” might be a bigger step in the right direction; Pro-Active interdependence.  Sounds nice, and how might we practice such interdependence – proactively?

Examples could be: car pooling, food coops, pot luck dinners, Wikipedia, Google Maps’ traffic updates using shared GPS signals, Ushahidi in Kenya maps civil unrest by SMS messages, Witness.org does it via user videos, and social media is rife with samples like Facebook, Twitter and Quora.

My favorite case in point, of course, is crowd-sourced video translation initiatives such as TED’s Open Translation Project, Adobe TV, Global Oneness.  Now dotSUB’s bold new “100 Translations Interdependence Challenge” will translate the inspiring short film A Declaration of Interdependence into a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action as volunteers from around the world translate the 4-minute film into as many different languages as possible. Apply here.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-lingual volunteers.  Translators will be credited with their name on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected – the film (opening September 16 in San Francisco, local US theaters thereafter), the Interdependence Movement, WE Campaign, Youth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Projects like our 100 Translations Interdependence Challenge are dotSUB’s practicing of collaboration, connectivity and interdependence as a company, a team and as individuals who believe we are all an integral part of the universe.

“I have inside me the winds, the deserts, the oceans, the stars, and everything created in the universe,” writes Paul Coelho.

And now the 100 Translations Challenge is inside us too!google awordsобразование интернет маркетингвзломать wi fi без программ

dotSUB Launches 100 Language Challenge for Interdependence

The Challenge

Help translate “A Declaration of Interdependence”, a globally crowd-sourced film, by Webby Awards Founder & award-winning filmmaker Tiffany Shlain, featuring music by Moby and translations enabled by dotSUB.

Together with skilled volunteers from around the world, we will translate this new 5-minute film into 100 or more languages as a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action. Apply Now!

What is Interdependence?

Well, some synonyms for interdependence are: interconnected, related, mutually beneficial, reliant on each other, but “A Declaration of Interdependence,” says it best here:

What’s Next?

Apply Now to our “100 Language Challenge for Interdependence” to help translate the English captions in “A Declaration of Interdependence”, film and connect your wisdom and heart with other global citizens. We’ll be back in touch in a week or sooner.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-linguals. All translators accepted will be credited with their name and language on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected (the film)Moxie Institute, the Interdependence Movement3-Legged Dog Art & Technology CenterWE CampaignYouth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Apply Now or learn more about the making of: A Declaration of Interdependence

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Six-month Deadline for Internet Closed Captioning Set By FCC

Closed CaptionsInternet consumers must be given experiences that are equal to, if not better than, the experiences provided when content was originally aired on television, is the new mandate included in the  July 13 report by FCC’s Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee on the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010.

So next January, advanced captioning for live and near-live programming must be online. By next July, all prerecorded programming “substantially edited” for the Internet must be captioned.  Carriers of Internet media must support closed-captioning and end-user display in terms of language, character color, opacity, size, edge, background and font.

“User settings are new to players which support Internet-delivered video, and will require time and effort to implement,” the Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee report said.

The new rules allow for Internet delivery of the single standard interchange format now used for digital television. Distributors can transcode for various playout options — such as proprietary or browser-based players — as long as the captioning characteristics are maintained.

Media giants Time-Warner, CNN and Netflix have all been recently sued in City, State and Federal Courts for violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by not providing the deaf with equal access or closed captions to “watch instantly” digital video, archived news and programming.

“The lack of captioned videos means that millions of people with hearing loss will continue to be denied equal access to video news content on CNN.com,” Anna Levine, the plaintiffs” attorney in the suit, said.

The Netflix lawsuit also states: “While streaming (video) provides more access to entertainment to the general public, it threatens to be yet another barrier to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.”

Consequences – legal costs, lost audiences, brand damage – for non-compliance seem serious now, and look like they are just getting started.

More Resources:

dotSUB’s General Overview: U.S. Accessibility Regulations for Online Video Captions

Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (October, 2010): Signed by President Barack Obama

Video Programming Accessibility Advisory Committee (July 2011): First Report on Closed Captioning of Video Programming Delivered Using Internet Protocol

Broadcast Engineering.com (July 2011): FCC sets six-month deadline for Internet closed captioning

KTVU.com (June 2011): CNN Being Sued For Lack Of Closed-Captioning Online

Paid Content (June 2011): Deaf Group Sues Netflix Over Lack Of Captions On Instant Viewing

National Association of the Deaf (NAD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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WETA’s Captions Increase & Sustain Their Video Viewership

WETA - PBS Washington, DC “I can’t wait to go home and read more!” is the feedback Brian King remembers from a participant in his user testing for Learning Media with captions added into online videos.

As WETA’s senior multimedia producer for Brainline.org, a program sharing information and creating support communities for people affected by traumatic brain injury, Brian is measuring first-hand how some media tools enable learning.

“User testing with people who have sustained traumatic brain injury revealed that many had a hard time fully understanding or viewing video content unless it had subtitles,” says Brian. ”The subtitles allowed them to focus on the task of reading, and isolate themselves from video content, which they sometimes found overwhelming.”

Launched in fall 2008, Brainline provides articles, interviews, expert webcasts, and multimedia “voices” on preventing, treating and living with traumatic brain injury. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) partnered with Washington, D.C.-based WETA to create Brainline.org. WETA is the third-largest producing station for PBS with co-productions including The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, Washington Week with Gwen Ifill, and documentaries by filmmaker Ken Burns.

“Many of our Learning Media projects receive federal funding, so making sure our video content has 508-compliant closed captions is critical,” Brian says. “Most importantly, we’ve been able to measure how adding captions dramatically increases both video viewership and the length of watching.”

In fact, 45% more people watched half or all of the videos tested when provided with captions as opposed to the same videos offered without. Users have also reported back to WETA that they really appreciate the captions.

“One reason is the quality of the captioning that dotSUB offers. it is far and above what we have had in the past,” says Brian. “And the dotSUB  team has been very responsive to dealing with the jargon-heavy scientific content we feature on some of our sites.”

WETA also ports dotSUB’s time-coded caption files over to WETA’s YouTube channel videos. This sync has also increased views on the captioned videos there. Brian’s team also believes using dotSUB’s interactive transcripts, which can bolster the ability to search for captioned content online, helps users find WETA’s videos online specifically because they are captioned.

“With over 2000 videos across our Learning Media department,” Brian explains, “we don’t have manpower to go through and tweak things by hand to implement captions.”

“So working with dotSUB made it much easier than imagined,” he continues. “Simply tagging videos to be processed “auto-magically” to then show captions saves us hundreds of hours that we can devote to other projects.”

Other projects – like working with Brainline users first-hand to understand their traumatic brain injury needs – and to serve them even better.стоимость поддержки сайтапроверка страницычитать чужую переписку в вк

Watch dotSUB.com Videos On Our iPhone App

dotSUB's iPhone app display

dotSUB’s iPhone app allows users to view any subtitled video from dotSUB.com on their iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. Thousands of videos are available in hundreds of languages right at your finger tips. So far the app is free, but iOS 4.0 or later is required.

Download the dotSUB iPhone App now and see for yourself.

Then, if you like it, please give us feedback and / or a great rating since we’ve not yet received enough ratings to display an average for the current version of our application.

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Can “Big Apple Goes Bananas” be Translated into Chinese?

The simple answer is… maybe, depending who you are trying to reach, and how you are trying to reach them. Translation is not only extremely subjective; it is actually an art form.

Just because someone can speak another language does not mean they can take what seems like a simple four-word advertising slogan and translate it with the same “feel” as in the original source language.

Recently, one of our clients called us with three different tag lines for a new product launch which they needed translated into 10 languages. Simple right?  Three tag-lines, each only three or four words, into 10 languages;  Oh, and by the way, they needed this done within 12 hours!

When we are translating, we always ask for as much background information as possible. Some of these questions may not seem relevant to someone who has never had materials translated. It’s important for us to know who you are trying to reach with your material. Will they be spoken or written?

So we often ask to see the source language taglines in context, meaning in the environment they will be displayed, so we can see what is around them, what the end-user will to see.

In some languages this can dramatically affect how the copy is translated. When we get copy out of context, it can be almost impossible to create a translation that’s interpreted in the target language with the same “feel” as intended.

Another particularly challenging issue: Are the taglines intended to have double and triple meanings? This may or may not be something that can be understood linguistically or culturally in some cases.

All this was not problem with these three taglines above, by the way; dotSUB delivered them, in 10, languages within 12 hours!

While we work with some of the best, most experienced, creative linguists in the business, our client made this fast turnaround possible by understanding that the linguistic process is complicated, cooperative and creative. With this kind of teamwork, your messages can reach further linguistically and culturally.

So if you have some tricky material for translation, give us a call and let’s put our teams to work!

~ Ed Zad, dotSUB’s Director of Language Services & Operations

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