Posts tagged ‘Facebook’

Connected to Everything In The Universe…

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”                  ~ John Muir

Muir, a 20th century naturalist, was certainly ahead of his time; before viruses were known, phones or radios used, even before U.S. National Parks – until he created the first one at Yosemite in 1899.  Muir knew “hitched-to-the-universe” experiences could come from sharing of nature.

It was a simpler time then; land was plenty, people few, and we didn’t really know as much about each other; we were still in discovery mode.  We could also claim ignorance to rape, famine, slavery, genocide, and even get away with it.

“We,” you say?  “’We’ could get away with it?”  “Not my problem, not my watch, nor my people,” most will exclaim, distancing ourselves from those “others.”

Yet now we can all see the earthquakes and hurricanes, feel the poverty and hunger, cringe at the Holocaust and Darfur, and who will forget 9/11?

By the same measure, we can celebrate Apartheid’s end and HIV’s decline, share the liberation of ‘Arab Spring” and the pride of a man on the moon.  We now know that human DNA is 99.9% the same.  And a new feature documentary film, Connected, by Tiffany Shlain explores this all brilliantly too.  So we get it; we’re related, connected, sometimes even reliant.

But could we go further?  Could humans connect more with each other?  Could we agree to truly universal basic human rights for all?  Could we actually become inter-dependent?

“In an interdependent relationship,” Wikipedia defines, “all participants are emotionally, economically, ecologically and/or morally self-reliant while at the same time responsible to each other.”

“Responsible to each other;” I like that; Response – able.  We sure respond to natural disasters around the globe well enough.

Except ongoing requests for food, water, medicine and equality require more listening, forethought and commitment.  “Proactive for each other” might be a bigger step in the right direction; Pro-Active interdependence.  Sounds nice, and how might we practice such interdependence – proactively?

Examples could be: car pooling, food coops, pot luck dinners, Wikipedia, Google Maps’ traffic updates using shared GPS signals, Ushahidi in Kenya maps civil unrest by SMS messages, Witness.org does it via user videos, and social media is rife with samples like Facebook, Twitter and Quora.

My favorite case in point, of course, is crowd-sourced video translation initiatives such as TED’s Open Translation Project, Adobe TV, Global Oneness.  Now dotSUB’s bold new “100 Translations Interdependence Challenge” will translate the inspiring short film A Declaration of Interdependence into a multi-cultural celebration of interdependence in action as volunteers from around the world translate the 4-minute film into as many different languages as possible. Apply here.

dotSUB’s translation process is fun, easy & rewarding for fluent multi-lingual volunteers.  Translators will be credited with their name on the websites of the Interdependence Day partner organizations including dotSUBConnected – the film (opening September 16 in San Francisco, local US theaters thereafter), the Interdependence Movement, WE Campaign, Youth Now and other interdependent global organizations.

Projects like our 100 Translations Interdependence Challenge are dotSUB’s practicing of collaboration, connectivity and interdependence as a company, a team and as individuals who believe we are all an integral part of the universe.

“I have inside me the winds, the deserts, the oceans, the stars, and everything created in the universe,” writes Paul Coelho.

And now the 100 Translations Challenge is inside us too!google awordsобразование интернет маркетингвзломать wi fi без программ

Watch dotSUB.com Videos On Our iPhone App

dotSUB's iPhone app display

dotSUB’s iPhone app allows users to view any subtitled video from dotSUB.com on their iPhone, iPod touch or iPad. Thousands of videos are available in hundreds of languages right at your finger tips. So far the app is free, but iOS 4.0 or later is required.

Download the dotSUB iPhone App now and see for yourself.

Then, if you like it, please give us feedback and / or a great rating since we’ve not yet received enough ratings to display an average for the current version of our application.

Enjoy dotSUB Mobile!siteконтекстная реклама в гуглевзлом пароля сайта одноклассники

Can “Big Apple Goes Bananas” be Translated into Chinese?

The simple answer is… maybe, depending who you are trying to reach, and how you are trying to reach them. Translation is not only extremely subjective; it is actually an art form.

Just because someone can speak another language does not mean they can take what seems like a simple four-word advertising slogan and translate it with the same “feel” as in the original source language.

Recently, one of our clients called us with three different tag lines for a new product launch which they needed translated into 10 languages. Simple right?  Three tag-lines, each only three or four words, into 10 languages;  Oh, and by the way, they needed this done within 12 hours!

When we are translating, we always ask for as much background information as possible. Some of these questions may not seem relevant to someone who has never had materials translated. It’s important for us to know who you are trying to reach with your material. Will they be spoken or written?

So we often ask to see the source language taglines in context, meaning in the environment they will be displayed, so we can see what is around them, what the end-user will to see.

In some languages this can dramatically affect how the copy is translated. When we get copy out of context, it can be almost impossible to create a translation that’s interpreted in the target language with the same “feel” as intended.

Another particularly challenging issue: Are the taglines intended to have double and triple meanings? This may or may not be something that can be understood linguistically or culturally in some cases.

All this was not problem with these three taglines above, by the way; dotSUB delivered them, in 10, languages within 12 hours!

While we work with some of the best, most experienced, creative linguists in the business, our client made this fast turnaround possible by understanding that the linguistic process is complicated, cooperative and creative. With this kind of teamwork, your messages can reach further linguistically and culturally.

So if you have some tricky material for translation, give us a call and let’s put our teams to work!

~ Ed Zad, dotSUB’s Director of Language Services & Operations

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dotSUB Founder’s Family in Facebook Friending Follies

When Parents Meddle on Facebook, the Kids Run for ‘Dislike’ Button…amNewYork

During a recent dinner, Daryl Smolens called her daughter Ali and asked her to tell the friend she was dining with “to have fun in Boston this weekend.”

“I turn to [him] and say, ‘I didn’t know you were going to Boston,’” recalled Ali. “My mom already knew because she had read it on Facebook, and here I am sitting next to him and I didn’t even know!”

The 25-year-old West Villager said it’s “100 percent” annoying when her mom knows more about what her friends are doing on Facebook than she does. And she’s not alone.

As Facebook’s popularity spikes among all generations, more parents are getting involved in their kids’ online lives — and it’s not always welcome.

dotSUB Founder's Family: Daryl & Ali Smolens

dotSUB Founder's Family: Daryl & Ali Smolens

“Without fail, every time I sign on [to Facebook], my mom already has commented on one of my friends’ status — even before I’ve had a chance to see it for the first time,” said Ali.

“I’ve known [Ali’s friends] forever,” said Daryl, 63, of the Upper East Side. “They are always at our house hanging out … not always with Ali around.

“I did tell Ali I would stop commenting [on her friends’ status], but, you know, I’m a mother.”

 

Wendy Sachs, editor in chief of Care.com, a parenting website, said: “Some kids definitely have a church/state feeling when it comes to Facebook, and they want to keep their parents out. But parents want to stay connected to their kids, and Facebook offers an often unedited look into what’s really going on in their lives.”

Many parents with younger children insist on having access to their Facebook page to ward off cyberbullying or other inappropriate activity. In an October Care.com survey, one in three parents of children 12 to 17 years old said they feared their kids being cyberbullied more than kidnapping, suicide, car accidents or terrorism.

“Cyberbullying has terrified parents, so monitoring is becoming increasingly important,” said Sachs, who has a 9-year-old son. But even she knows the drawbacks to giving parents permission to view your Facebook page.

“As a child of divorced parents, an innocuous post of a piece I wrote followed by a humorous comment by my dad led to a bitter comment from my mother,” Sachs said. “I ended up deleting the post and almost de-friending my mom on Facebook.”

Mark LoCastro knows that Facebook feuds can mushroom into larger family feuds. The 28-year-old Lower East Side resident wanted some privacy, so he limited access to his profile. But when his dad’s girlfriend discovered that she was blocked, things went south.

“The following day, she was real upset and contacted my dad,” he said.

After a conflict, LoCastro restored her access.

“I guess blocking someone important on Facebook, like a family member, is like blocking them out of your life,” he said. “People sometimes take Facebook too seriously.”

***

Facebook jabs cause real pain

It was once fair enough to say, “It’s just Facebook. Don’t take it so seriously.”

But those days are over, said Manhattan psychologist Dr. Joseph Cilona.

“The impact of Facebook … has significantly changed the landscape of social relationships for many people,” Cilona said. “In my experience, the overwhelming impact has been negative.”

Cilona said that in the past two or three years, “a week has rarely gone by that I have not heard at least several mentions about Facebook in my work.” He’s seen families ripped apart and lovers scorned by words or actions on Facebook.

“It’s clear that more and more people are taking Facebook very seriously,” he said. “It can certainly have serious real-world consequences.”

***

Make rules to nip Facebook chaos in the bud

Kelli Krafsky and her husband, Jason — who dub themselves “The Social Media Couple” and co-authored the book “Facebook and Your Marriage” — have some rules for themselves and their two teenagers:

For kids

1. Watch what you say. No swearing, no threats and no innuendos. And watch who you talk about: Don’t complain about parents, put down siblings or air family spats.

2. Be responsible. Kids must be held accountable for anything posted from their own profile.

3. No secrets. Parents must be able to view all pictures, videos, posts, updates, tags … everything.

For parents

1. Don’t parent on Facebook. Any real-time issues, such as chores, homework or grades, should be dealt with face-to-face, not on Facebook.

2. Back off. There are websites devoted to embarrassing parental posts on Facebook. Don’t humiliate them.

3. Parents have the final say. If you say a friend needs to be blocked, a page “unliked” or a password changed, then so be it. Explain why.рекламные фирмыpr продвижение в интернетескачать программу для взлома skype