Archive for the ‘Video’ Category.

For Brightcove Users

bclogoIn February of 2016, Brightcove released its newest video player Version 5.  This new Brightcove Player allows publishers to deliver 100% HTML5 to their audience.  Among other benefits, this means that there is complete independence from Flash.  In order to take advantage of this newer, faster technology, Brightcove requires WebVTT format for all new integrations.   Brightcove is also discontinuing support for other file formats and is encouraging clients to move to the WebVTT format before the end of 2017.

Dotsub supports the new Brightcove Player version 5 and provides the required WebVTT format for all new integrations. We will help you convert to the WebVTT format.  In order to convert the existing captions into the new format, you will need to supply Dotsub with the new Brightcove OAuth credentials from the Brightcove account administration panel.  When you are ready contact us via email at support@doub.com.

On the Dotsub side, we will republish to Brightcove all the links to your old caption and subtitle files in WebVTT format.  How long will it take? It’s usually a matter of a few minutes, but the length of time will depend on many factors such as volume and web traffic. The set-up is completely automated and does not require any human intervention.

If you have any question or concerns, please email support@dotsub.com.

Background Information:

https://help.dotsub.com/customer/portal/articles/2022656-brightcove-oauth-getting-started-guide

https://www.brightcove.com/en/blog/2016/02/say-goodbye-flash-brightcove-player-version-5

https://www.brightcove.com/en/blog/2016/12/flash-our-breakup-has-been-long-time-coming-and-its-not-you-its-all-us

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe_Flash

Education: Online Video is the New Normal

Many of Dotsub’s users are educators whether they think so or not.  Teaching a world-wide sales force about new products (Dell), giving tax advice (AARP), and providing the most up-to-date information on diabetes (Videum) can all be seen as educational.

In a recent featured article, Streaming Media reported that the educational video market is very healthy.  Established Lynda.com, an early player that provides skills based video courses in diverse topics, was purchased by LinkedIn for $1.5 billion.  MOOC vendors are all in the business of providing video education and are raising millions in funding.   Recently, Coursera raised $11.6 million and Udacity raised $105 million.

For educational institutions, the use of video is pervasive across the whole curriculum: arts, humanities, and sciences to professional and vocational. Kaltura’s The State of Video in Education 2015 found that 91% of respondents believe that video has a positive impact on student satisfaction and 82% agree that it increases student achievement levels. In addition, 67% of respondents believe it makes student onboarding easier and 64% feel that it increases retention and has a positive impact on Alumni.

Kaltura Graph

When not driven by a formal curriculum, what are professionals watching?

In an Onstream Media and Unisphere Research survey of more than 700 webcasting professionals released in September 2015, 62 percent said educational content for business was the dominant type of content they had consumed.


webcaster

Keeping in mind that these were professionals in the video webcasting industry…

Sources

http://www.streamingmedia.com/Articles/Editorial/Featured-Articles/The-State-of-Education-Video-2016-110211.aspx

http://site.kaltura.com/rs/984-SDM-859/images/The_State_of_Video_in_Education_2015_a_Kaltura_Report.pdf

 

Dotsub Convenes Panel at Streaming Media West

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Streaming Media West
November 17 – 18, 2015
World-Class Video: Speaking To the Heart of Enterprise ROI

To deliver video ROI, global enterprises need to touch as many people as possible. Increasing video search, reach, access, and engagement are key.  Video captions are proven to increase video views and completions as much as 40%. And getting local culture right is critical for growing new markets, teams and future revenues. Translated subtitles can connect your company to millions more hearts and minds. This panel of multi-national video pros will discuss what works, and doesn’t, and share insider how to on questions like: Where’s the most ROI? If quality is critical to your company, what are good enough translations? And what are the risks of missing deadlines, cultural faux pas, and brand damage of bad translations.

Moderator: Peter Crosby, Chief Revenue Officer – Dotsub.com

Charlie Ung, Workforce Communications and Enablement – IBM Digital Media

Anja Schaefer, VP – Lionbridge Global Solution Team

Michael Novak, CEO – One Plus Two Media

The New Video Web

The New Video Web blogged by David Orban

Apple-TV-speech-recognitionThe next generation information devices are going to seamlessly display video content not restricted to a simple window within the browser. The entire screen will be a video, with smart elements that must be understood by the computer in order for the user to fully interact with them.

When the Web was born, even support for still images was a last minute add-on. Slow connections, and uneven graphics support meant that to deliver full multimedia experiences (as it was called at the time), CD-ROMs were preferred. These had proprietary authoring platforms, and their user interfaces had relatively primitive navigation menus, with limited options for interactivity.

Slowly, video has been integrated into the online experience. “Bolted on” would be a better expression. Famously, the most popular plugin for browsers that played video, Flash, was the source of vulnerabilities, made browsers slower and was a drain on batteries. The proprietary nature of Flash made the entire Internet ecosystem dependent on one vendor, Adobe, and was not sustainable.

The HTML5 standard includes native support for video through a new tag in the language. HTML5 was released last year, and the various browsers are being updated to include full support for it. But in the meantime, through the years, an even more important change happened: the ubiquitous presence of Internet-connected devices made it necessary for video content to accommodate a variety of ways of interacting with it (via smartphones for example), not just through traditional browsers and computers.

What will this new video experience be? What we will see is the blurring of the boundaries between traditional browser experiences and video. The entire screen will become a “smart” video, with the entire field being interactive. The objects and components of the video will be live and recognizable by the device, and the user will be able to activate and manipulate them. Multiple modes of human interface will be available, including voice, haptic, motion and gestural. Rather than Web video, we will have the Video Web. (This concept has been suggested to me by my friend Michele Leidi, a live mind mapping expert.)

singUni

This is one of the reasons why platforms like Dotsub are so important. (Full disclosure, I am the Chief Innovation Officer of Dotsub, a New York based company which I led as CEO for four years.) Dotsub allows videos to be fully understood by computers, and people, in any language, as sound, text, context, and meaning. Making captions and translated subtitles a universal part of the online video experience, we can exploit their full value.

An important example of how this works in the new video web has been demoed by Apple during the keynote launching the latest Apple TV. On stage, at around minute 61 of the demo there was one particular moment of speech interaction: using the new remote with speech recognition. “What did she say?” The audience could listen to the audio track while reading the text at the same time so that what was said could be understood. This is a concrete example of how the presence of enhanced video, in the form of speech recognition and captions, and the universal assumption that captions will be available, enhances the user experience. Moreover, the entire Apple TV operating system itself, with all of its moving parts, and seamless integration of the videos, is an example of the concept of the emerging Video Web. Be on the lookout for more examples of this and an explosion in the richness of the Video Web in the near future.

David’s blog can be found here.

This post is also available in: Italian

Dotsub is a Proud Sponsor of the Mobile Film Festival!

Call for Videos – Deadline for submission is September 28, 2015.

This year the Mobile Film Festival is international and focused on the topic of Act for Climate Change. In collaboration with the United Nations, Dotsub, BNP Paribas, and Translators without Borders, this festival will celebrate the selection of 100 finalists and one Grand Prize winner presented under the auspices of the UN’s Climate Change Conference (COP21 -see sidebar) in Paris in December.

Visit the official COP21 website. Know about climate change? Take the COP21quiz.
Visit the official COP21 website.
Know about climate change? Take the COP21 quiz.

We sat with Bruno Smadja, founder and CEO of the Mobile Film Festival, to listen to his compelling story.

Now in its eleventh year, the Mobile Film Festival has always strived to discover, support and assist filmmakers following one single premise: 1 Mobile, 1 Minute, 1 Film. This year, the Mobile Film Festival is bringing an exciting opportunity to content creators – the festival is going global!  Smadja’s challenge is to reach out to the whole world to find one minute films made on mobile phones that express the artists’ unique viewpoint on the topic of Act on Climate Change.

As you can imagine, lining up organizations as diverse as this year’s sponsors, is the culmination of months of cooperation and collaboration.

BNP Paribas has supported the Mobile Film Festival in the past and continues their commitment to all aspects of cinema in France, as well as all types of film-related events, both in France and abroad. The BNP Paribas Grand Prize winner is granted € 30,000 to make one film in one year.

The participants will naturally shoot their films in their native languages. 100 films will be selected for the official competition. Dotsub founder and CEO, Michael Smolens, and Smadja have a long relationship, so it was natural for Smadja to reach out to Dotsub to provide the platform for captions and translations. “We were delighted to join in this inspiring endeavor,” explains Smolens, “The removal of cross-cultural and cross-lingual obstacles is Dotsub’s mission – which applies so well to the UN Conference and the Mobile Film Festival.”

“We are very honored to be partnering with the United Nations for this very special and international festival,” said Smadja, “We are also excited that Dotsub enables us to tell this story of worldwide importance by breaking down language barriers, giving these filmmakers the chance to vastly extend the reach of their films to a global audience.”

As submissions are in the artists’ own languages, Dotsub will provide the platform for providing captions and translations for the 100 finalists with translation into being done by NGO Translators without Borders as well as other approved translators in scores of languages.
MFFquoteThese 100 films will be selected in competition.  The first place film maker will be awarded a grant of €30,000 from BNP Paribas to be used for the production of a film within a year.  All awards will be awarded in a ceremony on December 7, 2015 in Paris.

“We have asked for film creators to tap into their passion for the environment as well use their ingenuity to suggest solutions – all in one minute shot on a mobile device.  The results are incredible, we already have submissions from all five inhabited continents!” exclaimed Smadja.

Smadja continues, “It has always been our mission to discover and support young film makers.  But to be able to focus on a topic with global impact, and to showcase their talent at such a prestigious event, the UN Conference on Climate Change, well, it is a dream come true!”

sched2For more information, including the rules of entry and to upload films go to www.mobilefilmfestival.com.

About Mobile Film Festival

Bruno Smadja created the Mobile Film Festival in 2005. For the past 11 editions it has been dedicated to discover, support and accompany young directors by proposing to take part to a smart challenge based on a unique idea 1 Mobile, 1 Minute, 1 Film.

The Mobile Film Festival 2015 is an online film competition to discover new talent while raising awareness of climate change worldwide. The use of mobile technology creates a more level playing field that gives wide distribution to new storytellers. Judged by a panel of filmmakers such as Fernando Meirelles, winners will be announced at a live awards ceremony at The United Nations Climate Change Conference 2015, with the Best Film getting put into production by a professional crew.

About Dotsub

Dotsub is a language product and services company making your online video available to all via translations, captions and voice-overs.  By increasing the global reach of your video, its value increases dramatically with added accessibility and audience engagement.  Our closed captions meet federal standards for the deaf and hearing impaired, and by offering translations in over 500 languages, Dotsub extends the influence of your video world-wide.  www.dotsub.com

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Dell’s Video Team Chooses Dotsub

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In early 2014, Dell chose the Dotsub platform because it offered an excellent price/performance ratio and just the right tools and features needed for scaling video globally.  At this time, Dotsub joined the network of trusted vendors that enable Dell’s successful video globalization process.

As with most large companies, Dell’s forays into the world of video and video localization grew organically. Captioning and translation of video are essential to Dell’s competiveness in international markets. The growth of video globalization was largely driven by regional demand and availability of resources. The results were some inconsistencies, and fragmented translation processes.  Of particular concern, the translation process could delay coordinated world-wide product launches.

Today, Dell has configured a multi-vendor end-to-end solution of which Dotsub is an integral part. Dell’s Video Team manages these diverse systems creating a centralized video translation business process.  They work hand in hand with Dell’s dedicated localization team and make use of a complex translation management system and various tools to automate the process.  Ralph Jung, who is Video Localization Program Manager in the IT organization at Dell, agreed to spend some time with us discussing their operation.

Dell has a deep commitment to video, localizing over 250 e-commerce videos per year into 14 target languages.  Jung states, “This commitment requires a process that is scalable, cost-efficient and fast, and that still offers a high level of quality.”

The majority of the videos Dell produces are product launch videos that explain features, emphasize the design, and provide demonstrations addressing real-life situations. Sometimes the video may be targeted at the Enterprise audience:

while others are made for the Consumer marketplace.  


[The video will automatically show the captions in the language of the page. Just click on the CC button and then Options to change the language as required.]

In the past, it was a challenge to coordinate all required video translations, at times holding up a world-wide campaign launch. Thanks to Dotsub, stakeholders can review and make any edits and corrections to the video’s translation at any time, even after the video was published.  Jung says, “Because Dotsub is easy to use, our reviewers can make changes for themselves,” he continues, “and then Dotsub will automatically sync their changes with the online videos in real-time.”

We asked Jung what he sees as an upcoming challenge in video localization. He feels that embedded and on screen text that needs to be translated is a particular headache.  Currently, it requires a separate copy of the video for each language and a person who is working with a professional video editing system.  Jung told us, “I imagine a future system where these translations are stored and handled in a similar fashion as closed captions on Dotsub, with easy editing through a web interface, and the ability to make corrections at any time.”

Over time, the Video Team’s processes have become Dell’s centralized one-stop-shop for anyone who needs their videos translated with closed captions.  The smoothness and precision of the operation has saved money allowing them to add four new languages to Dell’s international arsenal.

About Dell

Dell Inc. listens to customers and delivers innovative technology and services that give them the power to do more. For more information, visit www.dell.com.

About Dotsub

Dotsub is a language product and services company making your online video available to all via translations, captions and voiceovers.  By increasing the global reach of your video, its value increases dramatically with added accessibility and audience engagement.  Our closed captions meet federal standards for the deaf and hearing impaired, and by offering translations in over 500 languages, Dotsub extends the influence of your video world-wide.  www.dotsub.com

ADA Celebrates 25 Years!

The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed into law 25 years ago in July of 1990. The result of decades of unceasing work by disability advocates, the ADA is one of America’s most comprehensive pieces of civil rights legislation that prohibits discrimination and guarantees that people with disabilities have the same opportunities as everyone else to participate in the mainstream of American life.adaquote

Crucial to those in the video and language industries, the ADA included the deaf and hearing impaired community.  In the 90s, the internet was in its infancy, and the state of video was America’s Funniest Home Video (also celebrating its 25th anniversary).  Facebook (2004) and YouTube (2005) were at least a decade away.  The ADA, of course, only dealt with the existing telecommunications.

Captions and closed captions had been experimented with in the 70s.  In fact, Washington’s public television station and current Dotsub customer, WETA, successfully tested the closed captioning system in 1973.  Network broadcasting of regular shows with televisions equipped with closed caption decoders began in the 80s.

The disability advocates have continued to work ceaselessly with the ADA and the FCC to expand accessibility to include new technology.  The 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act expanded the scope of devices that must display captions to all video devices that display video programming transmitted simultaneously with sound, including those that can receive or display programming carried over the Internet.

Today, content service providers, such as broadcasters and cable companies, must provide closed captioning for 100% of all new, non-exempt, English language video programming.  The aim is to maintain the pace of accessibility with advances in technology.

The ADA is the model for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Treaty.  The Convention was adopted in December 2006 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, and was opened for signature on 30 March 2007. It was met with the highest number of signatories in history to a UN Convention on its opening day.  It is the first comprehensive human rights treaty of the 21st century and was enacted in May 2008.  Ironically, the U.S. is not a signatory.

ada25-logo-horiz-300

Sources:

http://www.un.org/disabilities/default.asp?navid=15&pid=150
http://www.ada.gov/ada_intro.htm
http://fpif.org/the-americans-with-disabilities-act-is-a-model-for-the-world-literally/
http://nad.org/issues/technology/captioning/when-required
http://www.ncicap.org/about-us/history-of-closed-captioning/

Michael Smolens Speaking at Cross Video Days (Video)

Dotsub’s Chairman. Michael Smolens gave the keynote speech at Cross Video Days in Paris. Michael’s talk emphasized expansion of video reach via language translation.  With more than 1,100 participants, Cross Video Days has established itself as a major event of the audiovisual industry in Europe gathering all actors in the value chain: authors, producers, TV, digital platforms, funding bodies, communication agencies and the most innovative cross-media brands and startups.

Here’s the keynote with English captions or Spanish translation.

Publishing Dotsub Videos to Facebook

Facebook is now one of the fastest growing video platforms, capturing over 1 billion video views every day. It’s not just friends and family who are posting videos, businesses are actively using Facebook video to promote their brands.

We have just released ‘Facebook Publish’. This new feature allows you to upload your Dotsub video’s captions and translations into Facebook seamlessly. You can publish to your personal Facebook account or to any Facebook Page you administer.

This feature is available to all our users starting today.

Dotsub Vimeo Connect

Dotsub is happy to announce our new ‘Vimeo Connect’ feature. This allows you to caption videos in your Vimeo account without uploading them to Dotsub.

You can even purchase Dotsub’s professional captions and translations for your Vimeo videos. Our Enterprise clients can now have their Dotsub project setup automatically connect video from their Vimeo account, as well as having the captions and translations pushed back to Vimeo.

This new connect feature can be accessed from our new upload page. Just hit ‘Videos in my Vimeo’ to start the process.

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If you have not already approved Vimeo access for Dotsub, you will be asked to. If you have already given Dotsub access to your Vimeo account, you will be brought directly to the Vimeo Connect page. Here you can select the videos in your Vimeo account by clicking the checkbox on the left. Once you have selected all the videos you wish to connect to Dotsub, select your desired license, permissions and video language at the bottom of the page and hit ‘Connect’.

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In a few seconds, you’ll see your video is in your Dotsub account ready to be captioned and translated. The caption and translation process works exactly the same as a video uploaded to Dotsub. To upload the captions back to Vimeo just hit ‘Sync Captions to Video on Viemo’ under ‘Publish Video’.
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The same great Dotsub caption and translation services are available to you for your Vimeo connected videos. You can order our services by clicking order from ‘My Videos’ or from the video page.
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Please note that because Vimeo connected videos are not stored on the Dotsub platform, we cannot create MP4 burn-ins. If a burn-in is required, the video must be uploaded to Dotsub. Also, clients who have established workflows, can continue doing it using the prior methodology.

For more details on automatically connecting videos in a Vimeo account or auto syncing caption content back to Vimeo, please contact your account manager.