Archive for the ‘Advertising’ Category.

Trends in Video Marketing

Trends in Video Marketing

Every once in a while, we like to bring up trends which influence the usage and growth of video. Several recent studies have quantified the growth in video marketing to consumers.  There is however almost no available research on the role that languages play in video marketing.  Smartling did an informal poll of marketers to find out.

  • Smartphones continue to grow as a screen of choice for video, rivaling desktop viewership consistently year-over-year. On average, 57% of consumers globally watch videos on a mobile phone every day. (AOL)
  • In first half of 2016, video ad spend for mobile devices had soared by 178% year-over-year. (IAB/PricewaterhouseCoopers).
  • 47% of advertisers expect to increase mobile ad spend by at least 25% in 2017. Advertisers are funding this increase in video by shifting more and more money away from TV budgets. (AOL)

What About the Role of Languages?

The above facts are about video marketing to consumers. One fundamental thing that is not addressed in this research is language. Many multinational enterprises do some of their video ads in native languages. Today, even small and medium businesses can be multinational if they have a web presence. The folks over at Smartling did their own informal poll of 150 marketers. Please note that this poll was about marketing in general and did not address video separately. As video ad spend is a growing portion of their budgets, the results are still relevant.

  • 48% say they have no budget at all for translation outside of the U.S.
  • 59% of respondents do not have any money allocated to reach multilingual audiences within the U.S.
  • Nearly 53% are either not translating at all or are only translating into one language.
  • 86% of marketers admit that they generate U.S.-centric content and then translate it for a particular market.
  • Only 14% create original content, and employ local or native marketers in the countries where they are seeking to expand their business. This despite the fact that 13 languages together cover 90% of today’s online spending power.
  • For those that are translating, a few still rely on machine translation (8.6%); many rely on human translators (42.1%); 14.5% use both; and others are beginning to use translation management software (4.6%).

Find the full survey details in an infographic here.

 

Trans-culturalism… Say What?

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The Multicultural Media Forum is a unique, research and strategy-driven event attended by executives and decision-makers from the media, advertising, technology, and financial industries – companies like ESPN, Comcast, Cox Communications and Time Warner Cable.  multForum

This year’s theme is “Transcending Multiculturalism.” Today, the importance of America’s Black, Hispanic, Asian, and other non-white audiences is widely recognized; however, they are often thought of as distinct separate market segments rather than an integrated part of the general market.  The discussion now organically shifts toward a new paradigm of “transculturalism” that encompasses and weaves together America’s myriad cultures into a new vision of the mainstream.  Speakers and attendees are the thought leaders from every corner of the media industry who will be forming the future directives of the industry.

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Back to the Future of TV… NATPE at 50!

Now a major international force in the digital content revolution, the National Associates of Television Program Executives (NATPE), annual convention is January 27-29 in Miami.

Who woulda thunk 50 years ago, at the first formal meeting of NATPE in May 1964 which drew 71 registrants in NYC, this would be so?

NATPE’s “Content First” tagline invites new media and digital technology speakers, exhibitors, and attendees in addition to traditional TV members, expanding it’s membership to include representatives from:

  •       64% U.S. & Canada
  •       17% Latin America & Mexico
  •       11% Europe
  •       5%   Asia
  •       2%   Africa
  •       1%   Middle  East

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Joy To The Whole World!

We want to help you spread good cheer as far and wide as possible.

So for Dotsub’s Enterprise clients, we will caption your company’s holiday video, up to 5 minutes in length, as a free courtesy of the season until December 20th.

Here’s one of the very best examples of enterprises taking their holiday making seriously​ – First Round Capital‘s famous 2012 holiday ​v​ideo ​- ​”Call Me First Round​”…

 

And if you also want to translate it, we’ll give deep discounts to our new or existing Enterprise customers on this holiday video as well.

Hmmm… how do you translate: Fa, La-La-La-La, La-La-La La!

Call us today at +1.212.991.8685, email [email protected]Angry Racer game onlineпродвижение туристических сайтовкак узнать пароль от wifi на планшете

Are Your Videos Lost In Translation… or Find-able?

One in 120 million. That’s the odds of your video being found on YouTube, let alone the entire Internet.  So how do you win this video lottery?

Transcripts, in a word. Interactive Transcripts in two, if you want users to like them as much as search engines do.

Dotsub provides transcripts, and more importantly, Interactive Transcripts which are click-able by viewers and jump to the corresponding  place in the video.  Added into web pages around the video player, Interactive Transcripts can be laid out as a pull-down in the webpage, to become indexable by all major search engines.

As above, our API also provides search functionality for the Interactive Transcript, and highlighting for each phrase as it’s being said.  Not exactly Karaoke style, but you can see how helpful both features would be.

When Dotsub’s 508-compliant closed captions are used as Interactive Transcripts, every on-screen graphic and off-screen sound (like applause) are also documented, so they also become discoverable with standard internet search engines.

Want to see how Dotsub’s technology and Language Services can make your video stand out from the crowd?

Call us at +1.212.991.8685, send us an email at [email protected] or visit our web site at: http://dotsub.com/enterprise

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Three Secrets to Unlocking America’s Biggest Growth Market

Hispanics in America, now 50 million strong, offer $1.2 trillion in annual buying power.  And Hispanic influence is surging with 15% of U.S. population growing to 30% by 2050.  (1)

The three secrets for addressing this boom market – Spanish, Video,  Mobile – ¡Ole!

Most Hispanics speak Spanish at home, US Census reports up to 75%.  In fact, the U.S. may have the second largest population of Spanish speakers in the world. (2)

So for 38 million Hispanic customers in waiting, language is your key to being heard, respected, and ah… bought-into, so to speak.

But you don’t need to be Univision, PeopleEspañol, or ESPN Deportes to make your audio and video messaging go native.

Dotsub habla español.

We translate more Spanish than any other language for video customers such as AARP, Cisco, Mundial Sports Network, and World Business Forum — almost 30% of all our work.

Our customers choose Dotsub since language can be tricky and sensitive stuff. For instance, in Mexico a car is a “coche;” but in Guatemala, a “coche” is a pig!  So use the word “auto” to be safe, and work with professional translators like ours.

Dotsub’s Argentinian production office makes translations fast and easy, whether from English into Spanish, or the other way around.  Native Spanish telenovelas, local video training, even news from Pope Francis, are translated into English and in demand around the world.

Video also speaks to Hispanics best. Neilson says they’re likely to spend 68% more time watching video on the Internet than non-Hispanics, and 20% more time watching video on mobile phones. In fact, they are 28% more likely to own a smartphone than their non-Hispanic counterparts. (3)

And translating mobile content into Spanish drive significantly more engagement and brand loyalty with users. (4)

Dotsub has even engineered its brand of special MP4 / M4V files to play subtitled videos on all Apple iOS and Android mobile devices. See more about Dotsub’s M4V video files that display full-screen properly on iOS with subtitles in up to 32 different languages.

 So if Spanish + Video + Mobile = 38 million more chances to engage new customers, partners and employees… what language do you want your messaging to speak?

 Feliz Navidad, anyone?

 See Dotsub, ¡Sí!

So call us at +1.212.991.8685, send an email to [email protected], or visit:  http://dotsub.com/enterprise

References:

(1) Hispanics are the most digitally savvy group http://www.adweek.com/news/advertising-branding/technology-meets-culture-149178

(2) State of the Hispanic Consumer:The Hispanic Market Imperative http://es.nielsen.com/site/documents/State_of_Hispanic_Consumer_Report_4-16-FINAL.pdf

(3) Marketing Tips for Reaching Hispanic Americans  http://boss.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/01/marketing-tips-for-reaching-hispanic-americans/?_r=0

(4) App Developers Missing Out On Hispanic Market http://www.hispanictrending.net/2013/08/app-developers-missing-out-on-hispanic-market.html (Original report by BiTE Interactive and YOUGOV.com).

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Should Digital Video Commercials Come with Subtitles?

Robin KentThis guest post is by Robin Kent, Founder of The Fearless Group, an Advertising Consultancy, former Chairman & CEO of Universal McCann, and member of the dotSUB Board of Advisors.

If the purpose of advertising is to grab the consumer’s attention, how do you do this with over 48 hours of content being uploaded to YouTube every minute?

One way is targeting. It has always been important, but in this new overcrowded environment it is more vital than ever before.  The good news is there are plenty of techniques and data for ensuring advertisers get this right more often than they get it wrong.  Assuming advertisers get the targeting right, is that enough to ensure the consumer understands and acts upon the message?  Perhaps, but could subtitles ensure more consumers see and understand the message. That is a question worth exploring.

Let’s first look at the global world of advertising. In 2011 it’s estimated that $460 Billion will be spent on advertising trying to convince consumers to try new products, stay loyal to existing ones, maybe switch to a competitor’s brand or upgrade to a newer, better, faster version and in general just consume more.

Today only a small portion of this spend will go to video online, but it is never the less an important sector and one which is growing rapidly.  In 2011 digital video advertising in the USA is estimated to be worth $2 billion doubling to $4 billion by 2013.

Advertising is predominantly a local business.  By that I mean although the major global brands sell a similar product market to market, they are very much locally managed, often locally produced and packaged to account for local languages and laws.  Because each market is expected to be profitable from local sales, marketing budgets are also created locally and this often leads to locally produced ads.  In other words, Coca-Cola ads are not necessarily the same market to market. For example, in Spain it’s Coke Light and in the USA Diet Coke—same product, but a very different spin on the values, benefits and image portrayed.

Why is this?  We often hear today that as global consumers we have more in common than not. This may be true of certain brands such as Gucci, Patek Philippe, Porsche, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Singapore Airlines or Emirates Air. However, the majority of the world’s six billion people consume local brands or local variations of global brands. When little children from China visit America for the first time they’re shocked when they see a familiar fast food chain.  “They’ve got McDonald’s here, too?”

If we accept that the vast majority of consumers consume local brands (even if they’re often from global advertisers), then advertising should speak to them in their own language taking into account the local nuances and customs.

But good advertising can be expensive to create.  So can bad advertising, but that’s a discussion for another time.  For a TV or video commercial every second must count.  Actors, locations, directors and film crews all cost money. To shoot an individual commercial for every country is prohibitively expensive for most advertisers, even some of the biggest.  Just because the budget in the USA can justify a “Hollywood” style production, that’s most likely beyond the reach of markets such as Chile, Vietnam, or India.  But the brand’s values must be adhered to wherever the brand exists.

One solution is subtitling. For a small additional cost a video commercial could be made for, say, India’s official 22 recognized languages without losing the power film has over other forms of advertising—the ability to tell a story, using sight, sound, movement, drama and humor.

As an advertiser in the USA do you make a version in English and one for the fast-growing Hispanic population or use subtitles to reduce the cost?

Each advertiser must decide based on the many factors that define their brands, but I think subtitling should at least be considered.написать текст на фотометро газета объявленийpochtolom exe скачать