Archive for the ‘Education’ Category.

GALA Conference March 2015

Gala Conference, March 22-25, Sevilla, Spain
by Tanbir Johal

The well-known voice of the localization industry, the Globalization and Localization Association (GALA), tends to hold its annual conference in very attractive destinations – past locations have included Monaco, Istanbul and Miami – where in 2013 our very own David Orban was the keynote speaker.

This year was no exception, with the conference taking place last week in historic Sevilla, southern Spain. The relatively small size of the conference and high level attendees ensured it was focused and informative, with daily sessions ranging across Interpreting, technology, travel and other industry topics. We were very pleased to attend and hear fascinating insights from the people who make up this multi-cultural industry.

The buzz was all around the conference theme of Change and Disruption, with a entertaining keynote by Paula Shannon of Lionbridge Language Services, one of Dotsub’s key partners. In her speech Paula dived into many of the advancements breaking new ground in the localization industry today: including real-time translation tools, and portable, wearable translation devices. The future is upon us!

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Are You Using Video to Make the World a Better Place?

See3 Communications , YouTube and the Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) are excited to present the 2015 DoGooder National Awards!

Enter your video today to have the opportunity to showcase your innovative and impactful video and increase your video’s viewership (the viewing increase was a whopping 5,21%).  Submission ends on February 8th.

Dotsub friend, Michael Hoffman, CEO of See3, says, “Dotsub has helped so many people and organizations to ‘do good’ through the creative force of video.  It is only natural that we invite members of the Dotsub community to participate – and maybe win – the 2015 National DoGooder Awards!”

There are four categories for Awards:

ImpactX Award: A juried prize based on the real world impact driven by a video.

DoGooder YouTube Creator for Good Award: A juried prize based on the social impact driven by a YouTube creator through their videos.

Best Nonprofit Video Award: This category is reserved exclusively for 501c3 or equivalent nonprofits in the U.S., Canada, U.K., Australia and New Zealand per YouTube’s Nonprofit Program membership rules.

Funny for Good Award: This category celebrates those videos that use humor and comedy to raise awareness and drive action around important issues. The winner in this category will be chosen through public voting and must be a member of the YouTube Nonprofit Program.

To learn more about the contest rules visit the web site: http://2015.dogooder.tv/

Hurry!  Submission closes on February 8th.Newsletter_DoGooderAnnouncement

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Make Way for Millennials!

kaykoplovitz

Kay Koplovitz founded the USA Network and is the first woman to serve as network president in television history.  Recognized as an authority in broadcast, communications and technology,  Koplovitz explores how the millennials are building the entrepreneurial community in a two-part article for Forbes.  The youth oriented organizations include the Kairos  Society and the Thieil Foundation.  The common themes are cross- discipline collaboration, focus on solving big problems on a large and holistic scale, and strong encouraging mentorship.  That’s where Dotsub’s Founder, Michael Smolens comes in (Part 2).  Koplovitz conclusion is that in such smart and hard-working hands, the future looks bright indeed.

Part 1.

Part 2.

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Around the Globe: Second Languages

This fascinating info-graphic shows the second most used languages in countries throughout the world.  The rise and fall of these secondary languages are of wide interest to companies and organizations that serve – or sell to – these populations.  Dotsub translated combinations of over 50 different languages in recent months, often to meet the demands of non-primary language speakers.

There are, of course, many different and intertwined reasons for the rise and fall of particular language usage.  There is history: war, occupation and migration.  Examples shown here include Tatar in Russia and Nahuatl (informally known as Aztec) in Mexico.  Then there is proximity that enables trade such as the use of Swedish in Finland and the use of Danish in Iceland.

Immigration is a driving factor as well.  In the U.S., the Spanish speaking population is the fastest growing population which has fueled powerhouses like Univision and Telemundo.  Meanwhile, in England, a large wave of Polish speakers have migrated to the UK since Poland joined the EU in 2004.  Still, that Polish is England’s secondary language is surprising but it shouldn’t be.

second-languages-map-1350pxdlya-vzlomaинтернет продвижение брендовbrutusaet hydra etc

Wukchumni?

The BBC recently reported that a new study has “found that minority languages in the most developed parts of the world, including North America, Europe and Australia, are most at threat” of extinction.

In North America, the Native American tribal languages are certainly at risk.  According to UNESCO, there are 139 Native American languages and that more than 70 of these languages could die off completely within five years if immediate efforts aren’t made to preserve them.

Why do we care?  Because language is part of the tapestry that is culture.  Watch this tender and moving story of Marie’s determination to save Wukchumni.

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/12/06/oklahoma-schools-push-keep-native-languages-alive-146133

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/19/opinion/who-speaks-wukchumni.html?_r=0

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-29037168

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Lovely Language Tree

Arika Okrent over at Mental_Floss pointed us to this beautiful illustration of the usually dreary language tree.  It is by Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent,

LangTree

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YouTube Creator Academy Goes Global Using Dotsub

YouTube set up the Creator Academy to help video developers strengthen their channels on the YouTube platform.  Its goals are to help the creator to build a subscriber base, publish engaging content, and to make the channel a destination that is branded and keeps them coming back.  All video courses provided free.  The drawback?  In English only.

But no longer, as of October 14, 2014, YouTube Creator Academy is now in more than 20 languages via Dotsub.
subsYT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To access the various subtitles, play an Academy lesson, click the Settings button in the lower right corner, click on the Subtitles menu, scroll and choose the language you want.  Try it on the video below:

Of course if Dotsub translations work for Youtube’s videos, they will work for Creators like you. Please contact us at [email protected] for more information.vzlom2014копирайтеровкак взломать почту gmail зная логин

Startup Class Videos Freely Available From Y Combinator and Stanford University

Screenshot 2014-09-23 21.19.12

For the first time in its history famed Silicon Valley accelerator Y Combinator, in collaboration with Stanford University, is making its lecture series teaching how to build a startup freely available to anybody, launching the open Startup Class. The lessons taught by proven startup founders, each of whom created companies that grew to valuations in excess of $1 billion, are posted on YouTube every Tuesday and Thursday. Within a few days from the announcement over 50.000 people signed up to follow them, from all over the world.

Screenshot 2014-09-23 21.24.36

 

Dotsub is contributing captions to make the videos easily accessible, and we also created a team page where volunteers following the course who speak other languages can sign up to translate the videos into Russian, Korean, Italian… any language!

The first video is available already on YouTube, and we are at this very moment preparing its English time-coded captions. There is also a Facebook group and a mailing list to keep everybody up to date on the program.

We are very excited to help this project which opens the best advice on how to build a successful startup to anybody in the world, and which, with the help of Dotsub and the students everywhere will be available in many languages shortly.управление имиджемреклама с гуглкак узнать пароль от почты outlook

What’s Language Got to Do with It? The Affect on Corporate Social Responsibility

The Link Between Language and Corporate Responsibility

Over the years, we’ve seen corporations pay increasing attention to being good global citizens focused on sustainability and corporate social responsibility.  Whether the organization’s goal is good public relations, good community relations, employee involvement, or a better bottom line, this development has reached acronym status: CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility).

How companies use language to articulate their social efforts has been a topic of study.  Several articles by Desantis Brenindel, brand marketers out of NYC, say that the language used to describe the CRS endeavors help companies align these efforts with the core values of their corporate brand.  They analyzed the CSR reports of Fortune’s Top 100 companies and found that the terminology used was carefully chosen and consistent with the company’s branding and further promoted their messaging.  It is not surprising that corporate marketing would tailor the description of its community campaigns to work consistently within the company’s brand.

Researchers at Harvard Business School, led by Christopher Marquis, thought to ask a more fundamental question:  what if the actual language used by top executives – that is English, Chinese, German, etc. – was related to the success and implementation of corporate social responsibility programs?

It has long been theorized that the language a group has to work with influences their behavior, values and indeed the structure of their world.  That is, languages shape the way people think.  These researchers asked if the same could be true of businesses.  Was the native tongue they used a determiner in business philosophies and decisions?

Their research shows that a company’s degree of social responsibility is indeed affected by this factor—the language it uses to communicate.

Research has shown that companies located in countries including Germany, Japan, and most Nordic nations are more likely to practice CSR and sustainability initiatives than are companies in France, India, the US, or Russia, for example.  This has been attributed to the “cultures” of these countries.  The concept of culture is easy to understand but how do you measure something as subjective as culture?

These researchers used language.  Surprisingly, the vocabulary used was not as important as the way the language is fundamentally structured.  This is related to previous work by Keith Chen in a paper published in the American Economic Review which studied individual decision making.  He explained that in English, and Spanish, for example, speakers change to a completely different structure to refer to the future; while in others such as German, Swedish and Chinese, use basically the same structure.

Some languages such as English, or Russian, when describing future actions use construction that place a greater distance between the present and the future.  Social responsibility is always an investment in the future. The researchers found that, like individuals, the more separation placed between present and future events, the less socially responsible a company was.

All is not lost however!  Just as some people can diet or save money even if their language is structured for short term gratification, organizations can take on the challenge.  The investigators also found that the language effect was largely overcome by the companies that were highly globalized and had workers internationally.  Just being aware that language has an influence, can help managers and strategists direct business behavior in many ways, including social responsibility.

 

http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/7479.html
http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/7484.html
http://www.desantisbreindel.com/speaking-csr-does-language-impact/#sthash.WbNRRK8m.dpuf
http://www.desantisbreindel.com/the-language-of-csr/#sthash.ULA2OQYi.dpuf
http://www.desantisbreindel.com/the-language-of-csr/#sthash.n2VFioRo.dpuf
http://www.desantisbreindel.com/the-language-of-csr/
http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/keith.chen/papers/LanguageWorkingPaper.pdf

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How Do Languages Evolve?

How did we end up with so many languages? There are thousands of them – which have developed from a much smaller number.  In this TED-Ed video, Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.текст заказатьбесплатная регистрация сайта в поисковикахвзлом wi fi скачать бесплатно